Merge lp:~mako/ubuntu-codeofconduct/proposed-revision into lp:ubuntu-codeofconduct

Proposed by Benjamin Mako Hill on 2009-06-11
Status: Merged
Merged at revision: not available
Proposed branch: lp:~mako/ubuntu-codeofconduct/proposed-revision
Merge into: lp:ubuntu-codeofconduct
Diff against target: 258 lines
2 files modified
CodeOfConduct.txt (+75/-72)
rationale.txt (+95/-0)
To merge this branch: bzr merge lp:~mako/ubuntu-codeofconduct/proposed-revision
Reviewer Review Type Date Requested Status
Mike Basinger (community) 2009-06-11 Approve on 2009-06-22
Review via email: mp+7341@code.launchpad.net
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review: Approve
6. By Benjamin Mako Hill on 2009-06-23

merged in minor changes from Emma Jane Hogbin

7. By Benjamin Mako Hill on 2009-07-07

clarified release time mention (typo)

8. By Benjamin Mako Hill on 2009-10-18

merged in a series of minor changes from Mark Shuttleworth

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1=== modified file 'CodeOfConduct.txt'
2--- CodeOfConduct.txt 2009-06-05 09:13:22 +0000
3+++ CodeOfConduct.txt 2009-10-18 21:25:18 +0000
4@@ -1,79 +1,82 @@
5-= Ubuntu Code of Conduct =
6+= Ubuntu Code of Conduct v1.1 =
7
8-This Code of Conduct covers your behaviour as a member of the Ubuntu
9+This Code of Conduct covers our behaviour as members of the Ubuntu
10 Community, in any forum, mailing list, wiki, web site, IRC channel,
11-install-fest, public meeting or private correspondence. The Ubuntu
12-Community Council will arbitrate in any dispute over the conduct of a
13-member of the community.
14+install-fest, public meeting or private correspondence. Ubuntu
15+governance bodies are ultimately accountable to the Ubuntu Community
16+Council and will arbitrate in any dispute over the conduct of a member
17+of the community.
18
19- '''Be considerate.''' Your work will be used by other people,
20- and you in turn will depend on the work of others. Any decision
21- you take will affect users and colleagues, and we expect you to
22- take those consequences into account when making decisions. For
23- example, when we are in a feature freeze, please don't upload
24- dramatically new versions of critical system software, as other
25- people will be testing the frozen system and will not be
26- expecting big changes.
27+ '''Be considerate.''' Our work will be used by other people, and
28+ we in turn will depend on the work of others. Any decision we take
29+ will affect users and colleagues, and we should take those
30+ consequences into account when making decisions. Ubuntu has
31+ millions of users and thousands of contributors. Even if it's not
32+ obvious at the time, our contributions to Ubuntu will impact the
33+ work of others. For example, changes to code, infrastructure,
34+ policy, documentation, and translations during a release may
35+ negatively impact others' work.
36
37 '''Be respectful.''' The Ubuntu community and its members treat
38 one another with respect. Everyone can make a valuable
39- contribution to Ubuntu. We may not always agree, but
40- disagreement is no excuse for poor behaviour and poor
41- manners. We might all experience some frustration now and then,
42- but we cannot allow that frustration to turn into a personal
43- attack. It's important to remember that a community where people
44- feel uncomfortable or threatened is not a productive one. We
45- expect members of the Ubuntu community to be respectful when
46- dealing with other contributors as well as with people outside
47- the Ubuntu project and with users of Ubuntu.
48-
49- '''Be collaborative.''' Ubuntu and Free Software are about
50- collaboration and working together. Collaboration reduces
51- redundancy of work done in the Free Software world, and improves
52- the quality of the software produced. You should aim to
53- collaborate with other Ubuntu maintainers, as well as with the
54- upstream community that is interested in the work you do. Your
55- work should be done transparently and patches from Ubuntu should
56- be given back to the community when they are made, not just when
57- the distribution releases. If you wish to work on new code for
58- existing upstream projects, at least keep those projects
59- informed of your ideas and progress. It may not be possible to
60- get consensus from upstream or even from your colleagues about
61- the correct implementation of an idea, so don't feel obliged to
62- have that agreement before you begin, but at least keep the
63- outside world informed of your work, and publish your work in a
64- way that allows outsiders to test, discuss and contribute to
65- your efforts.
66-
67- '''When you disagree,''' consult others. Disagreements, both
68- political and technical, happen all the time and the Ubuntu
69- community is no exception. The important goal is not to avoid
70- disagreements or differing views but to resolve them
71- constructively. You should turn to the community and to the
72- community process to seek advice and to resolve
73- disagreements. We have the Technical Board and the Community
74- Council, both of which will help to decide the right course for
75- Ubuntu. There are also several Project Teams and Team Leaders,
76- who may be able to help you figure out which direction will be
77- most acceptable. If you really want to go a different way, then
78- we encourage you to make a derivative distribution or
79- alternative set of packages available using the Ubuntu Package
80- Management framework, so that the community can try out your
81- changes and ideas for itself and contribute to the discussion.
82-
83- '''When you are unsure,''' ask for help. Nobody knows
84+ contribution to Ubuntu. We may not always agree, but disagreement
85+ is no excuse for poor behaviour and poor manners. We might all
86+ experience some frustration now and then, but we cannot allow that
87+ frustration to turn into a personal attack. It's important to
88+ remember that a community where people feel uncomfortable or
89+ threatened is not a productive one. We expect members of the
90+ Ubuntu community to be respectful when dealing with other
91+ contributors as well as with people outside the Ubuntu project and
92+ with users of Ubuntu.
93+
94+ '''Be collaborative.''' Collaboration is central to Ubuntu and to
95+ the larger free software community. This collaboration involves
96+ individuals working with others in teams within Ubuntu, teams
97+ working with each other within Ubuntu, and individuals and teams
98+ within Ubuntu working with other projects outside. This
99+ collaboration reduces redundancy, and improves the quality of our
100+ work. Internally and externally, we should always be open to
101+ collaboration. Wherever possible, we should work closely with
102+ upstream projects and others in the free software community to
103+ coordinate our technical, advocacy, documentation, and other work.
104+ Our work should be done transparently and we should involve as
105+ many interested parties as early as possible. If we decide to
106+ take a different approach than others, we will let them know early,
107+ document our work and inform others regularly of our progress.
108+
109+ '''When we disagree, we consult others.''' Disagreements, both
110+ social and technical, happen all the time and the Ubuntu
111+ community is no exception. It is important that we resolve
112+ disagreements and differing views constructively and with the help
113+ of the community and community processes. We have the Technical
114+ Board, the Community Council, and a series of other governance
115+ bodies which help to decide the right course for Ubuntu. There are
116+ also several Project Teams and Team Leaders, who may be able to
117+ help us figure out the best direction for Ubuntu. When our goals
118+ differ dramatically, we encourage the creation of alternative sets of
119+ packages, or derivative distributions, using the Ubuntu Package
120+ Management framework, so that the community can test new ideas and
121+ contribute to the discussion.
122+
123+ '''When we are unsure, we ask for help.''' Nobody knows
124 everything, and nobody is expected to be perfect in the Ubuntu
125- community (except of course the SABDFL). Asking questions avoids
126- many problems down the road, and so questions are
127- encouraged. Those who are asked should be responsive and
128- helpful. However, when asking a question, care must be taken to
129- do so in an appropriate forum. Off-topic questions, such as
130- requests for help on a development mailing list, detract from
131- productive discussion.
132-
133- '''Step down considerately.''' Developers on every project come
134- and go and Ubuntu is no different. When you leave or disengage
135- from the project, in whole or in part, we ask that you do so in
136- a way that minimises disruption to the project. This means you
137- should tell people you are leaving and take the proper steps to
138- ensure that others can pick up where you leave off.
139+ community. Asking questions avoids many problems down the road,
140+ and so questions are encouraged. Those who are asked questions should
141+ be responsive and helpful. However, when asking a question, care must
142+ be taken to do so in an appropriate forum.
143+
144+ '''Step down considerately.''' Members of every project come and
145+ go and Ubuntu is no different. When somebody leaves or disengages
146+ from the project, in whole or in part, we ask that they do so in a
147+ way that minimises disruption to the project. This means they
148+ should tell people they are leaving and take the proper steps to
149+ ensure that others can pick up where they left off.
150+
151+We pride ourselves on building a productive, happy and agile community
152+that can welcome new ideas in a complex field, and foster collaboration
153+between groups with very different needs, interests and goals. We hold
154+our leaders to an even higher standard, in the Leadership Code of
155+Conduct, and arrange the governance of the community to ensure that
156+issues can be raised with leaders who are engaged, interested and
157+competent to help resolve them.
158+
159
160=== added file 'rationale.txt'
161--- rationale.txt 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000
162+++ rationale.txt 2009-10-18 21:25:18 +0000
163@@ -0,0 +1,95 @@
164+The Code of Conduct was written in a day by a single person and revised
165+by only a handful of others before it was posted on the Ubuntu website.
166+At the time, there was no Ubuntu community.
167+
168+With time, the code has taken up a more important role than any of its
169+authors imagined. It is now explicitly agreed to by thousands of
170+Launchpad account holders and by hundreds of Ubuntu Members as a condition
171+of their franchise. It has become the central written pillar of the Ubuntu
172+community and has provided the basis for dozens of similar codes in other
173+communities. As a result, it is not lightly that we approach the task of
174+creating the first revision of the code since its creation.
175+
176+But over the last 5 years, the Ubuntu community has grown in ways and to
177+degrees that were unanticipated. The Code of conduct plays a very
178+different -- and more important -- role that it did at first. In order
179+to reflect these changes and to create a stronger and more appropriate
180+Code of Conduct for the Ubuntu Community of today, we offer this
181+proposed revision. We have tried to keep changes as small as possible
182+and to ensure that all proposed changes are fully in the spirit, if not
183+the language, of the original code.
184+
185+== Goals with revision 1.1 ==
186+
187+Our primary goal in this version of the Code of Conduct was to remove
188+what we saw as an overly technical focus. When the first Code of Conduct
189+was written, Ubuntu was an entirely technical project. There were no
190+users, no support systems, and very little in the way of non-technical
191+contributions from anyone. That has changed. In fact, the vast majority
192+of the Ubuntu community contributes to the Ubuntu project is ways other
193+than through writing code and making packages. We want our code to
194+reflect this and to speak to the reality of the Ubuntu community today.
195+
196+Additionally, several of our proposed changes are designed to reflect
197+the growth of the Ubuntu governance system. We changed several
198+references to the CC and its power to make it clear that the CC's
199+important role has now been delegated to a series of new governance
200+boards (e.g., the Forums Council and the IRC Council).
201+
202+The original version of the Code of Conduct used the term "you" to refer
203+to a description of how people should act. Since the code of conduct is
204+(as we like to say) not a stick to be wielded, but rather a description
205+of how we feel our community should act, we changed the language so
206+that, where it is not too awkward, we use "we" instead of "you."
207+
208+== List of specific Changes ==
209+
210+Throughout the text, we:
211+
212+ - changed references from "you" to "we" and changed the text in other
213+ minor ways to make this set of changes read more cleanly
214+
215+In the opening paragraph, we:
216+
217+ - changed the reference to the Community Council to refer to other
218+ governance bodies as well the CC
219+
220+In the section on ''Be considerate'', we:
221+
222+ - changed the example used to be less focused on code changes around
223+ release and tried to generalize the example to a variety of other
224+ areas in Ubuntu
225+
226+In the section on ''Be collaborative'', we:
227+
228+ - rewrote the section to remove a strong technical focus and an
229+ emphasis on inter-project and Ubuntu-upstream relationships, and
230+ removed the examples around patch workflow
231+
232+ - tried to most clearly emphasize the way that collaboration plays
233+ important roles within teams, between teams, and between Ubuntu and
234+ the larger free software community
235+
236+ - generalised the types of work that Ubuntu community members do
237+
238+ - changed the reference from members to community members (membership
239+ didn't exist with the CC was written)
240+
241+In the section on ''When we disagree'', we:
242+
243+ - mentioned governance bodies other than the CC
244+
245+ - we emphasized that working separately should only happen when
246+ differences are dramatic
247+
248+In the section on ''When you are unsure'', we :
249+
250+ - have changed the reference to technical mailing lists to one that
251+ incorporates of community venues within Ubuntu.
252+
253+ - removed the joking reference to SABDFL (there's nothing funny about
254+ the SABDFL)
255+
256+In the section on ''Step down considerately.'', we:
257+
258+ - changed the reference from "Developers" to "Members"

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