Merge lp:~frank-heimes/installation-guide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more into lp:~ubuntu-core-dev/installation-guide/ubuntu

Proposed by Frank Heimes on 2018-06-21
Status: Merged
Merged at revision: 548
Proposed branch: lp:~frank-heimes/installation-guide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more
Merge into: lp:~ubuntu-core-dev/installation-guide/ubuntu
Diff against target: 2313 lines (+1213/-234)
27 files modified
build/entities/common.ent (+2/-0)
build/templates/docstruct.ent (+5/-3)
doc/cheatsheet.xml (+8/-0)
en/appendix/chroot-install.xml (+226/-41)
en/appendix/files.xml (+35/-19)
en/appendix/preseed.xml (+373/-45)
en/boot-installer/intro-firmware.xml (+2/-1)
en/boot-installer/trouble.xml (+4/-2)
en/hardware/disk-storage.xml (+36/-0)
en/hardware/hardware-supported.xml (+4/-3)
en/howto/installation-howto.xml (+78/-20)
en/install-methods/usb-setup/x86.xml (+4/-2)
en/partitioning/device-names.xml (+35/-17)
en/partitioning/partition-programs.xml (+4/-4)
en/partitioning/schemes.xml (+1/-1)
en/partitioning/sizing.xml (+3/-3)
en/post-install/rescue.xml (+329/-50)
en/preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml (+6/-5)
en/using-d-i/modules/localechooser.xml (+4/-2)
en/using-d-i/modules/mdcfg.xml (+4/-2)
en/using-d-i/modules/netcfg.xml (+5/-2)
en/using-d-i/modules/network-console.xml (+4/-2)
en/using-d-i/modules/partman-crypto.xml (+9/-3)
en/using-d-i/modules/partman.xml (+7/-5)
en/using-d-i/modules/pkgsel.xml (+5/-2)
en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml (+7/-0)
en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml (+13/-0)
To merge this branch: bzr merge lp:~frank-heimes/installation-guide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more
Reviewer Review Type Date Requested Status
Ubuntu Core Development Team 2018-06-21 Pending
Review via email: mp+348331@code.launchpad.net

Commit message

Adjusted and expanded info on IBM Z aka s390x starting with rescue,recovery mode up to the entire appendix;
especially preseed and debootstrap;
fixed some nested xml element usage, that prevents building pdfs under special circumstances
this also solves LP 1564788

Description of the change

worked on, updated and expanded:
- modified docstruct, to add s390x specific disk storage
- 8.7. Recovering a Broken System - en/post-install/rescue.xml - added rescue more for s390x!
- fixed <note> element usage issues
           ~/work/installationguide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more$ ./build/buildone.sh amd64 en "html pdf"
           openjade:build.tmp/install.en.profiled.xml:2371:6:E: end tag for "note" which is not finished
           openjade:build.tmp/install.en.profiled.xml:2371:6:E: end tag for "note" which is not finished
           Error: build of pdf failed with error code 1
           Warning: The following formats failed to build: pdf
- figured out that nested <para> is not a good idea - html generation accepts that, but not tex,dvi,pdf
          hard to find a bad nesting situation that happend while including one docbook file into another:
          disk-storage.xml including dasd.xml and fcp.xml
- A. Installation Howto - installation-howto.xml
- A.1. Booting the installer
- A.2. Installation
- A.3. And finally…
- B.1. Introduction
- B.2. Using preseeding - ./en/appendix/preseed.xml
- B.3. Creating a preconfiguration file (no change)
- 2.1.6. Disk Storage (complete new sub-chapter)
          ./en/hardware/hardware-supported.xml --> reference and add: &disk-storage.xml; --> ./build/templates/docstruct.ent
          /en/hardware$ cp supported-peripherals.xml disk-storage.xml
          fheimes@T570:~/work/installationguide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more$ bzr add ./en/hardware/disk-storage.xml
          adding en/hardware/disk-storage.xml
          What about the other translations ? They pull-in en if no translation is available.
- ./en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml - is empty --> content added (incl. partition limits)
          fheimes@T570:~/work/installationguide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more$ bzr add ./en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml
   done - ./en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml - is missing --> file created and content added (incl. partition limits)
          fheimes@T570:~/work/installationguide/ubuntu-18.04-s390x-appendices_and_more$ bzr add ./en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml
          adding en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml
- Adding a separate s390x preseed example ?
- B.4. Contents of the preconfiguration file (for bionic)
- B.5. Advanced options
- Appendix C. Partitioning for Ubuntu
- C.1. Deciding on Ubuntu Partitions and Sizes
- C.2. The Directory Tree
- C.3. Recommended Partitioning Scheme
- C.4. Device Names in Linux - device-names.xml
- C.5. Ubuntu Partitioning Programs
- Appendix D. Random Bits
- D.1. Linux Devices
- D.2. Disk Space Needed for Tasks
- D.3. Disk Space Needed
- D.4. Installing Ubuntu from a Unix/Linux System
- nothing todo on: Appendix E. Administrivia and the rest

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1=== modified file 'build/entities/common.ent'
2--- build/entities/common.ent 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
3+++ build/entities/common.ent 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
4@@ -88,6 +88,8 @@
5 <!-- Size of the basic installation -->
6 <!ENTITY base-system-size "506">
7 <!ENTITY std-system-size "822">
8+ <!ENTITY base-system-size-s390x "1064"> <!-- no idea where the above numbers come from, hence I defined a separate entity with my measurements for s390x -->
9+ <!ENTITY std-system-size-s390x "1343"> <!-- no idea where the above numbers come from, hence I defined a separate entity with my measurements for s390x -->
10 <!-- Desktop environment task - GNOME -->
11 <!ENTITY task-desktop-gnome-inst "2487">
12 <!ENTITY task-desktop-gnome-dl "765">
13
14=== modified file 'build/templates/docstruct.ent'
15--- build/templates/docstruct.ent 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
16+++ build/templates/docstruct.ent 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
17@@ -30,8 +30,9 @@
18 <!ENTITY supported-powerpc.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/supported/powerpc.xml">
19 <!ENTITY supported-s390.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/supported/s390.xml">
20 <!ENTITY supported-sparc.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/supported/sparc.xml">
21- <!ENTITY network-cards.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/network-cards.xml">
22- <!ENTITY supported-peripherals.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/supported-peripherals.xml">
23+ <!ENTITY network-cards.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/network-cards.xml">
24+ <!ENTITY disk-storage.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/disk-storage.xml">
25+ <!ENTITY supported-peripherals.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/supported-peripherals.xml">
26 <!ENTITY accessibility-hardware.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/accessibility.xml">
27 <!ENTITY buying-hardware.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/buying-hardware.xml">
28 <!ENTITY installation-media.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/hardware/installation-media.xml">
29@@ -94,12 +95,13 @@
30 <!ENTITY boot-installer-accessibility.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/boot-installer/accessibility.xml">
31 <!ENTITY boot-installer-trouble.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/boot-installer/trouble.xml">
32
33- <!ENTITY using-d-i.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/using-d-i.xml">
34+ <!ENTITY using-d-i.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/using-d-i.xml">
35 <!ENTITY using-d-i-components.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/components.xml">
36
37 <!ENTITY module-localechooser.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/localechooser.xml">
38 <!ENTITY module-s390-netdevice.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/s390/netdevice.xml">
39 <!ENTITY module-s390-dasd.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml">
40+ <!ENTITY module-s390-fcp.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml">
41 <!ENTITY module-ddetect.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/ddetect.xml">
42 <!ENTITY module-kbd-chooser.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/kbd-chooser.xml">
43 <!ENTITY module-netcfg.xml SYSTEM "##SRCPATH##/using-d-i/modules/netcfg.xml">
44
45=== modified file 'doc/cheatsheet.xml'
46--- doc/cheatsheet.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
47+++ doc/cheatsheet.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
48@@ -145,6 +145,14 @@
49 A paragraph only interesting for Linux/arm64 users.
50 </para>
51
52+<para arch="s390">
53+A paragraph only interesting for Linux/s390 users.
54+</para>
55+
56+<para arch="not-s390">
57+A paragraph not interesting for Linux/s390 users.
58+</para>
59+
60 <sect3 condition="bootable-from-hard-disk">
61 A section pertaining only to computers which
62 can boot from their hard disk.
63
64=== modified file 'en/appendix/chroot-install.xml'
65--- en/appendix/chroot-install.xml 2016-04-18 21:37:25 +0000
66+++ en/appendix/chroot-install.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
67@@ -74,6 +74,8 @@
68 # swapon /dev/<replaceable>sda5</replaceable>
69 </screen></informalexample>
70
71+<note><para>Instead of using a dedicated swap partition, you may omit the swap partition setup here and later just use a swap file instead.</para></note>
72+
73 Mount one partition as <filename>/mnt/ubuntu</filename> (the
74 installation point, to be the root (<filename>/</filename>) filesystem
75 on your new system). The mount point name is strictly arbitrary, it is
76@@ -113,6 +115,7 @@
77 </footnote>. Install <command>wget</command> and
78 <command>ar</command> if they aren't already on your current system,
79 then download and install <command>debootstrap</command>.
80+If these steps are executed under &debian; you can simply do this by <userinput>apt install debootstrap</userinput>.
81
82 </para>
83
84@@ -209,7 +212,56 @@
85 Depending on the value of TERM, you may have to install the
86 <classname>ncurses-term</classname> package to get support for it.
87
88-</para>
89+<note><para>
90+If warnings occur like:
91+<informalexample><screen>
92+bash: warning: setlocale: LC_ALL: cannot change locale (en_US.UTF-8)
93+</screen></informalexample>
94+The required localization files need to be generated:
95+<informalexample><screen>
96+# sudo locale-gen en_US.UTF-8
97+Generating locales (this might take a while)...
98+ en_US.UTF-8... done
99+Generation complete.
100+</screen></informalexample>
101+</para></note>
102+
103+</para>
104+
105+ <sect3>
106+ <title>Configure Apt</title>
107+<para>
108+
109+Debootstrap will have created a very basic <filename>/etc/apt/sources.list</filename> that will allow installing
110+additional packages. However, it is suggested that you add some additional sources,
111+for example for source packages and security updates:
112+</para><para>
113+<informalexample><screen>
114+deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename; main
115+
116+deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename;-security main
117+deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename;-security main
118+</screen></informalexample>
119+</para><para>
120+Make sure to run <userinput>apt update</userinput> after you have
121+made changes to the sources list.
122+
123+</para>
124+ </sect3>
125+
126+
127+ <sect3>
128+ <title>Install additional packages</title>
129+<para>
130+
131+Now it's required to install some additionally required packages, like makedev (needed for the next section):
132+<userinput>apt install makedev</userinput>
133+
134+</para><para arch="s390">
135+Or in case using the &architecture; architecture the mandatory s390-tools package: <userinput>apt install s390-tools</userinput>
136+
137+</para>
138+ </sect3>
139
140 <sect3>
141 <title>Create device files</title>
142@@ -230,13 +282,14 @@
143 <itemizedlist>
144 <listitem><para>
145
146-install the makedev package, and create a default set of static device files
147-using (after chrooting)
148+create a default set of static device files using (after chrooting)
149 <informalexample><screen>
150-# apt-get install makedev
151 # mount none /proc -t proc
152 # cd /dev
153 # MAKEDEV generic
154+or depending on your specific architecture:
155+# MAKEDEV std
156+# cd ..
157 </screen></informalexample>
158
159 </para></listitem>
160@@ -244,12 +297,72 @@
161
162 manually create only specific device files using <command>MAKEDEV</command>
163
164+</para><para arch="s390">
165+On &architecture; the DASD devices need to be created this way:
166+<informalexample><screen>
167+# cd /dev
168+# MAKEDEV dasd
169+# cd ..
170+</screen></informalexample>
171+
172 </para></listitem>
173+<!-- this is an alternate method to create DASD devices -->
174+<!-- <listitem arch="s390"><para>
175+
176+If using DASD devices a manual creation of the device node(s) might be needed.
177+For this the major/minor device number of the DASD that is going to be used is needed (for DASDs the major number is always 94):
178+Find this out on your host system with:
179+<informalexample><screen>
180+$ cat /proc/dasd/devices | grep dasdb
181+0.0.260b(ECKD) at ( 94: 12) is dasdb : active at blocksize: 4096, 1803060 blocks, 7043 MB
182+</screen></informalexample>
183+
184+With that the device nodes and partitions entries can be created:
185+<informalexample><screen>
186+# mknod -m 660 /dev/dasdb b 94 12
187+# mknod -m 660 /dev/dasdb1 b 94 12
188+# ls -l /dev/dasd*
189+brw-rw - - - - 1 root root 94, 12 Jun 20 04:45 /dev/dasdb
190+brw-rw - - - - 1 root root 94, 12 Jun 20 04:46 /dev/dasdb1
191+</screen></informalexample>
192+
193+It's recommended to do a quick check if the partition is accessible by:
194+<informalexample><screen>
195+# fdasd -ps /dev/dasdb
196+ /dev/dasdb1 2 150254 150253 1 Linux native
197+</screen></informalexample>
198+</para></listitem> -->
199+
200 <listitem><para>
201
202-bind mount /dev from your host system on top of /dev in the target system;
203-note that the postinst scripts of some packages may try to create device
204-files, so this option should only be used with care
205+bind mount /dev from your host system on top of /dev in the target system, like:
206+<informalexample><screen>
207+mount --bind dev /dev
208+</screen></informalexample>
209+Note that the postinst scripts of some packages may try to create device files,
210+so this option should only be used with care.
211+
212+</para></listitem>
213+<listitem arch="s390"><para>
214+mount proc and sysfs
215+</para><para>
216+You can mount the proc and sysfs file systems multiple times and to arbitrary
217+locations, though <filename>/proc</filename> and <filename>/sys</filename> respectively are customary.
218+
219+<informalexample><screen>
220+# mount -t proc proc /proc
221+# mount -t sysfs sysfs /sys
222+</screen></informalexample>
223+
224+</para><para>
225+
226+The command <userinput>ls /proc</userinput> should now show a non-empty
227+directory. Should this fail, you may be able to mount proc from outside
228+the chroot:
229+
230+<informalexample><screen>
231+# mount -t proc proc /mnt/ubuntu/proc
232+</screen></informalexample>
233
234 </para></listitem>
235 </itemizedlist>
236@@ -257,6 +370,37 @@
237 </para>
238 </sect3>
239
240+ <sect3 arch="s390">
241+ <title>DASD Disks and Partitions</title>
242+<para>
243+Even if <command>lsdasd</command> already lists DASD devices:
244+<informalexample><screen>
245+# lsdasd
246+Bus-ID Status Name Device Type BlkSz Size Blocks
247+==============================================================================
248+0.0.1601 active dasda 94:0 ECKD 4096 7043MB 1803060
249+0.0.260a active dasdb 94:4 ECKD 4096 7043MB 1803060
250+</screen></informalexample>
251+...they - and other CCW devices like DASD, FCP oder QETH devices as well - cannot be fully and persistently used, yet.
252+<informalexample><screen>
253+# lszdev --online | head -n 1 &amp;&amp; lszdev --online | grep dasd-eckd
254+TYPE ID ON PERS NAMES
255+dasd-eckd 0.0.0123 yes no dasda
256+dasd-eckd 0.0.1234 yes no dasdb
257+</screen></informalexample>
258+Here DASD 1234 is the one used for debootstrap.
259+Now make this particular DASD persistently active with the help of the usual <command>chzdev</command> tool:
260+<informalexample><screen>
261+# chzdev -e 1234
262+ECKD DASD 0.0.1234 configured
263+# lszdev --online 1234
264+TYPE ID ON PERS NAMES
265+dasd-eckd 0.0.1234 yes yes dasdb
266+</screen></informalexample>
267+Repeat similar steps for other CCW devices, like FCP, QETH devices or further DASD devices - if needed.
268+</para>
269+ </sect3>
270+
271 <sect3>
272 <title>Mount Partitions</title>
273 <para>
274@@ -269,7 +413,7 @@
275
276 Here is a sample you can modify to suit:
277
278-<informalexample><screen>
279+<informalexample arch="not-s390"><screen>
280 # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
281 #
282 # file system mount point type options dump pass
283@@ -289,6 +433,17 @@
284 /dev/XXX /home ext3 rw,nosuid,nodev 0 2
285 </screen></informalexample>
286
287+<informalexample arch="s390"><screen>
288+# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
289+# hand-crafted
290+# file system mount point type options dump pass
291+#
292+/dev/dasdb1 / ext4 defaults 0 1
293+
294+/swapfile none swap sw 0 0
295+</screen></informalexample>
296+
297+
298 Use <userinput>mount -a</userinput> to mount all the file systems you
299 have specified in your <filename>/etc/fstab</filename>, or, to mount
300 file systems individually, use:
301@@ -309,6 +464,8 @@
302 # ln -s media/cdrom
303 </screen></informalexample>
304
305+</para><para arch="not-s390">
306+
307 You can mount the proc and sysfs file systems multiple times and to arbitrary
308 locations, though <filename>/proc</filename> and <filename>/sys</filename> respectively are customary. If you didn't use
309 <userinput>mount -a</userinput>, be sure to mount proc and sysfs before continuing:
310@@ -365,7 +522,7 @@
311 <para>
312
313 To configure networking, edit
314-<filename>/etc/network/interfaces</filename>,
315+<filename>/etc/network/interfaces</filename>, <!-- FIXME: may need to be adapted to netplan for Ubuntu -->
316 <filename>/etc/resolv.conf</filename>,
317 <filename>/etc/hostname</filename> and
318 <filename>/etc/hosts</filename>.
319@@ -450,28 +607,6 @@
320 </sect3>
321
322 <sect3>
323- <title>Configure Apt</title>
324-<para>
325-
326-Debootstrap will have created a very basic
327-<filename>/etc/apt/sources.list</filename> that will allow installing
328-additional packages. However, it is suggested that you add some additional sources,
329-for example for source packages and security updates:
330-
331-<informalexample><screen>
332-deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename; main
333-
334-deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename;-security main
335-deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu &releasename;-security main
336-</screen></informalexample>
337-
338-Make sure to run <userinput>aptitude update</userinput> after you have
339-made changes to the sources list.
340-
341-</para>
342- </sect3>
343-
344- <sect3>
345 <title>Configure Locales and Keyboard</title>
346 <para>
347
348@@ -480,13 +615,13 @@
349 Currently the use of UTF-8 locales is recommended.
350
351 <informalexample><screen>
352-# aptitude install language-pack-de language-pack-gnome-de
353+# apt install language-pack-de language-pack-gnome-de
354 </screen></informalexample>
355
356 To configure your keyboard (if needed):
357
358 <informalexample><screen>
359-# aptitude install console-setup
360+# apt install console-setup
361 # dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration
362 </screen></informalexample>
363
364@@ -515,8 +650,9 @@
365 Then install the kernel package of your choice using its package name.
366
367 <informalexample><screen>
368-# aptitude install &kernelpackage;-<replaceable>arch-etc</replaceable>
369+# apt install &kernelpackage;-<replaceable>arch-etc</replaceable>
370 </screen></informalexample>
371+(You may want install <filename>linux-image-generic</filename>, too.)
372
373 </para>
374 </sect2>
375@@ -528,7 +664,7 @@
376 To make your &debian-gnu; system bootable, set up your boot loader to load
377 the installed kernel with your new root partition. Note that
378 <command>debootstrap</command> does not install a boot loader, though you
379-can use <command>aptitude</command> inside your &debian; chroot to do so.
380+can use <command>apt</command> inside your &debian; chroot to do so.
381
382 </para><para arch="any-x86">
383
384@@ -552,7 +688,7 @@
385 Installing and setting up <classname>grub2</classname> is as easy as:
386
387 <informalexample><screen>
388-# aptitude install grub-pc
389+# apt install grub-pc
390 # grub-install /dev/<replaceable>sda</replaceable>
391 # update-grub
392 </screen></informalexample>
393@@ -561,7 +697,7 @@
394 the MBR of <literal>sda</literal>). The last command will create a sane
395 and working <filename>/boot/grub/grub.cfg</filename>.
396
397-</para><para>
398+</para><para arch="not-s390">
399
400 Note that this assumes that a <filename>/dev/sda</filename> device file has
401 been created. There are alternative methods to install <command>grub2</command>,
402@@ -610,6 +746,55 @@
403 On some machines, you may need to use <userinput>ide0:</userinput>
404 instead of <userinput>hd:</userinput>.
405
406+</para><para arch="s390">
407+The <quote>zipl</quote> bootloader is part of the <quote>s390-tools</quote> package that was installed earlier.
408+Check <userinput>man zipl.conf</userinput> for instructions on setting up the bootloader.
409+Either create a <filename>zipl.conf</filename> configuration from scratch or copy over and modify the existing one.
410+
411+</para><para arch="s390">
412+
413+Here is a basic <filename>/etc/zipl.conf</filename> as an example:
414+
415+<informalexample><screen>
416+[defaultboot]
417+defaultmenu = menu
418+
419+:menu
420+target = /boot
421+1 = ubuntu
422+default = 1
423+
424+[ubuntu]
425+target = /boot
426+image = /boot/vmlinuz
427+ramdisk = /boot/initrd.img
428+parameters = root=/dev/dasdb1
429+</screen></informalexample>
430+
431+Since the <filename>kernel</filename> and <filename>initrd</filename> filesnames in <filename>/boot</filename> are versioned,
432+it's recommended to link them to non-versioned default names, like:
433+<informalexample><screen>
434+# ln -s /boot/vmlinuz-4.15.0-23-generic /boot/vmlinuz
435+# ln -s /boot/initrd.img-4.15.0-23-generic /boot/initrd.img
436+
437+# ls -la /boot/vmlinuz* /boot/initrd.img*
438+lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 28 Jun 20 07:31 /boot/initrd.img -> initrd.img-&lt;version&gt;-generic
439+-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 11245088 Jun 20 07:14 /boot/initrd.img-&lt;version&gt;-generic
440+lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 25 Jun 20 07:31 /boot/vmlinuz -> vmlinuz-&lt;version&gt;-generic
441+-rw------- 1 root root 4390912 May 23 12:54 /boot/vmlinuz-&lt;version&gt;-generic
442+</screen></informalexample>
443+
444+Finally don't forget to execute the <command>zipl</command> command for writing the configuration to disk:
445+<informalexample><screen>
446+# zipl
447+Using config file '/etc/zipl.conf'
448+Building bootmap in '/boot'
449+Building menu 'menu'
450+Adding #1: IPL section 'ubuntu' (default)
451+Preparing boot device: dasdb (&lt;your dasd device number&gt;).
452+Done.
453+</screen></informalexample>
454+
455 </para>
456 </sect2>
457
458@@ -622,10 +807,9 @@
459 SSH and set up access.
460
461 <informalexample><screen>
462-# aptitude install ssh
463+# apt install openssh-server <!-- FIXME: was formerly 'ssh' - no condition available to limit text to ubuntu-only or not-debian -->
464 </screen></informalexample>
465
466-
467 Root login with password is disabled by default, so setting up access can be
468 done by setting a password and re-enable root login with password:
469
470@@ -667,10 +851,11 @@
471 to install all packages with <quote>standard</quote> priority:
472
473 <informalexample><screen>
474+# apt install tasksel
475 # tasksel install standard
476 </screen></informalexample>
477
478-Of course, you can also just use <command>aptitude</command> to install
479+Of course, you can also just use <command>apt</command> to install
480 packages individually.
481
482 </para><para>
483@@ -680,7 +865,7 @@
484 diskspace by running:
485
486 <informalexample><screen>
487-# aptitude clean
488+# apt clean
489 </screen></informalexample>
490
491 </para>
492
493=== modified file 'en/appendix/files.xml'
494--- en/appendix/files.xml 2016-04-18 21:54:24 +0000
495+++ en/appendix/files.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
496@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@
497
498 </para><para>
499
500-<informaltable><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
501+<informaltable arch="not-s390"><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
502 <row>
503 <entry><filename>fd0</filename></entry>
504 <entry>First Floppy Drive</entry>
505@@ -29,20 +29,36 @@
506 <informaltable><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
507 <row>
508 <entry><filename>sda</filename></entry>
509- <entry>First hard disk</entry>
510+ <entry>First <phrase arch="s390">SCSI/FCP </phrase>hard disk</entry>
511 </row><row>
512 <entry><filename>sdb</filename></entry>
513- <entry>Second hard disk</entry>
514+ <entry>Second <phrase arch="s390">SCSI/FCP </phrase>hard disk</entry>
515 </row><row>
516 <entry><filename>sda1</filename></entry>
517- <entry>First partition of the first hard disk</entry>
518+ <entry>First partition of the first <phrase arch="s390">SCSI/FCP </phrase>hard disk</entry>
519 </row><row>
520 <entry><filename>sdb7</filename></entry>
521- <entry>Seventh partition of the second hard disk</entry>
522-</row>
523-</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
524-
525-<informaltable><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
526+ <entry>Seventh partition of the second <phrase arch="s390">SCSI/FCP </phrase>hard disk</entry>
527+</row>
528+</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
529+
530+<informaltable arch="s390"><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
531+<row>
532+ <entry><filename>dasda</filename></entry>
533+ <entry>First DASD disk</entry>
534+</row><row>
535+ <entry><filename>dasdb</filename></entry>
536+ <entry>Second DASD disk</entry>
537+</row><row>
538+ <entry><filename>dasda1</filename></entry>
539+ <entry>First partition of the first DASD disk</entry>
540+</row><row>
541+ <entry><filename>dasdb7</filename></entry>
542+ <entry>Seventh partition of the second DASD disk</entry>
543+</row>
544+</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
545+
546+<informaltable arch="not-s390"><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
547 <row>
548 <entry><filename>sr0</filename></entry>
549 <entry>First CD-ROM</entry>
550@@ -52,7 +68,7 @@
551 </row>
552 </tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
553
554-<informaltable><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
555+<informaltable arch="not-s390"><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
556 <row>
557 <entry><filename>ttyS0</filename></entry>
558 <entry>Serial port 0, COM1 under MS-DOS</entry>
559@@ -71,8 +87,8 @@
560 <informaltable><tgroup cols="2"><tbody>
561 <row>
562 <entry><filename>cdrom</filename></entry>
563- <entry>Symbolic link to the CD-ROM drive</entry>
564-</row><row>
565+ <entry>Symbolic link to the <phrase arch="s390">(virtual) </phrase>CD-ROM drive</entry>
566+</row><row arch="not-s390">
567 <entry><filename>mouse</filename></entry>
568 <entry>Symbolic link to the mouse device file</entry>
569 </row>
570@@ -176,10 +192,10 @@
571 <title>Disk Space Needed for Tasks</title>
572 <para>
573
574-A standard installation for the amd64 architecture, including all standard
575-packages and using the default kernel, takes up &std-system-size;MB of disk space.
576-A minimal base installation, without the <quote>Standard system</quote>
577-task selected, will take &base-system-size;MB.
578+A standard installation for the <phrase arch="not-s390">amd64</phrase><phrase arch="s390">&architecture;</phrase> architecture, including all standard
579+packages and using the default kernel, takes up <phrase arch="not-s390">&std-system-size;</phrase><phrase arch="s390">&std-system-size-s390x;</phrase>MB of disk space.
580+A minimal base installation, without the <quote>Basic &debian; server</quote>
581+task selected, will take <phrase arch="not-s390">&base-system-size;</phrase><phrase arch="s390">&base-system-size-s390x;</phrase>MB.
582
583 </para>
584 <important><para>
585@@ -315,9 +331,9 @@
586 <title>Disk Space Needed</title>
587 <para>
588
589-A minimal server installation of &releasename; requires 400MB of disk space.
590-<phrase condition="supports-desktop">The standard Ubuntu desktop installation
591-requires 2GB.</phrase>
592+A minimal server installation of &releasename; requires <phrase arch="not-s390">400MB</phrase><phrase arch="s390">1.1GB</phrase> of disk space.
593+<phrase arch="s390">However, it's recommended to add some extra space. Better plan with at least 2GB for the operating system plus 1GB as room for growth.</phrase>
594+<phrase condition="supports-desktop">The standard Ubuntu desktop installation requires 2GB.</phrase>
595
596 </para>
597 </sect1>
598
599=== modified file 'en/appendix/preseed.xml'
600--- en/appendix/preseed.xml 2016-04-18 21:37:25 +0000
601+++ en/appendix/preseed.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
602@@ -72,28 +72,44 @@
603 </thead>
604
605 <tbody>
606-<row>
607- <entry>CD/DVD</entry>
608+<row arch="s390">
609+ <entry>generic (network install)</entry>
610+ <entry>yes</entry>
611+ <entry>no</entry>
612+ <entry>yes</entry>
613+</row><row>
614+ <entry>CD/DVD
615+ <footnote arch="s390" id='load-from-removable-media'>
616+ <para>
617+ can be done with the help of the HMC task <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem>.
618+ On &architecture; this is not comparable to other architectures and technically close to a <quote>generic (network install)</quote>.
619+ </para>
620+ </footnote>
621+ </entry>
622 <entry>yes</entry>
623 <entry>yes</entry>
624 <entry>yes<footnote id='apx-ps-net'>
625-
626 <para>
627 but only if you have network access, and set <literal>preseed/url</literal>
628 appropriately
629 </para>
630-
631- </footnote></entry>
632-</row><row>
633+ </footnote>
634+ </entry>
635+</row><row arch="not-s390">
636 <entry>netboot</entry>
637 <entry>yes</entry>
638 <entry>no</entry>
639 <entry>yes</entry>
640-</row><row>
641+</row><row arch="not-s390">
642 <entry>hd-media <phrase condition="bootable-usb">(including usb-stick)</phrase></entry>
643 <entry>yes</entry>
644 <entry>yes</entry>
645 <entry>yes<footnoteref linkend="apx-ps-net"/></entry>
646+</row><row arch="s390">
647+ <entry>USB drive<footnoteref linkend="load-from-removable-media"/></entry>
648+ <entry>yes</entry>
649+ <entry>yes</entry>
650+ <entry>yes</entry>
651 </row><row condition="supports-floppy-boot">
652 <entry>floppy based (cd-drivers)</entry>
653 <entry>yes</entry>
654@@ -104,11 +120,6 @@
655 <entry>yes</entry>
656 <entry>no</entry>
657 <entry>yes</entry>
658-</row><row arch="s390">
659- <entry>generic</entry>
660- <entry>yes</entry>
661- <entry>no</entry>
662- <entry>yes</entry>
663 </row>
664 </tbody>
665
666@@ -135,7 +146,8 @@
667 questions from being asked is to preseed them through the boot parameters,
668 as described in <xref linkend="preseed-bootparms"/>.
669
670-</para><para>
671+</para></important>
672+<important><para>
673
674 In order to easily avoid the questions that would normally appear before the
675 preseeding occurs, you can start the installer in <quote>auto</quote>
676@@ -256,17 +268,21 @@
677 </para><para>
678
679 For the other preseeding methods you need to tell the installer what file
680-to use when you boot it. This is normally done by passing the kernel a boot
681-parameter, either manually at boot time or by editing the bootloader
682-configuration file <phrase arch="linux-any">(e.g.
683-<filename>syslinux.cfg</filename>) and adding the parameter to the end of
684-the append line(s) for the kernel.</phrase><phrase arch="kfreebsd-any">(e.g.
685-<filename>grub.cfg</filename>) and adding the parameter as a new
686-<literal>set</literal> line for the kernel.</phrase><phrase arch="hurd-any">(e.g.
687+to use when you boot it. This is normally done <phrase arch="not-s390">by passing the kernel a boot
688+parameter, either manually at boot time or</phrase> by editing the bootloader
689+configuration file <phrase arch="any-86"> <!-- changed from linux-any to any-x86 -->
690+(e.g. <filename>syslinux.cfg</filename>) and adding the parameter to the end of
691+the append line(s) for the kernel.</phrase>
692+<phrase arch="kfreebsd-any">(e.g. <filename>grub.cfg</filename>) and adding the parameter as a new
693+<literal>set</literal> line for the kernel.</phrase>
694+<phrase arch="hurd-any">(e.g.
695 <filename>grub.cfg</filename>) and adding the parameter to the end of the
696 <filename>gnumach.gz</filename> line.</phrase>
697
698-</para><para>
699+<phrase arch="s390">(e.g.
700+<filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename>) and adding the parameter to the end (however, the file is empty by default).</phrase>
701+
702+</para><para arch="not-s390">
703
704 If you do specify the preconfiguration file in the bootloader configuration,
705 you might change the configuration so you don't need to hit enter to boot the
706@@ -282,21 +298,28 @@
707 md5sum, and if specified it must match the preconfiguration file or the
708 installer will refuse to use it.
709
710-</para>
711-
712-<informalexample><screen>
713+</para><para>
714 Boot parameters to specify:
715+</para>
716+<informalexample><screen>
717 - if you're netbooting:
718 preseed/url=http://host/path/to/preseed.cfg
719 preseed/url/checksum=5da499872becccfeda2c4872f9171c3d
720 - or
721+ preseed/url=ftp://host/path/to/preseed.cfg
722+ preseed/url/checksum=5da499872becccfeda2c4872f9171c3d
723+- or
724 preseed/url=tftp://host/path/to/preseed.cfg
725 preseed/url/checksum=5da499872becccfeda2c4872f9171c3d
726+</screen></informalexample>
727
728-- if you're booting a remastered CD:
729+<informalexample><screen>
730+- if you're booting a remastered CD or image:
731 preseed/file=/cdrom/preseed.cfg
732 preseed/file/checksum=5da499872becccfeda2c4872f9171c3d
733+</screen></informalexample>
734
735+<informalexample arch="not-s390"><screen>
736 - if you're installing from USB media (put the preconfiguration file in the
737 toplevel directory of the USB stick):
738 preseed/file=/hd-media/preseed.cfg
739@@ -333,18 +356,13 @@
740 <userinput><replaceable>path/to/variable</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></userinput>
741 for any of the preseed variables listed in the examples in this appendix.
742 If a value is to be used to configure packages for the target system, you
743-will need to prepend the <firstterm>owner</firstterm><footnote>
744-
745-<para>
746+will need to prepend the <firstterm>owner</firstterm><footnote><para>
747 The owner of a debconf variable (or template) is normally the name of the
748 package that contains the corresponding debconf template. For variables
749 used in the installer itself the owner is <quote>d-i</quote>.
750 Templates and variables can have more than one owner which helps to
751 determine whether they can be removed from the debconf database if the
752-package is purged.
753-</para>
754-
755-</footnote> of the variable as in
756+package is purged.</para></footnote> of the variable as in
757 <userinput><replaceable>owner</replaceable>:<replaceable>path/to/variable</replaceable>=<replaceable>value</replaceable></userinput>.
758 If you don't specify the owner, the value for the variable will not be
759 copied to the debconf database in the target system and thus remain unused
760@@ -366,7 +384,7 @@
761 <literal>url</literal>. Another example is the <literal>tasks</literal>
762 alias, which translates to <literal>tasksel:tasksel/first</literal>.
763
764-</para><para>
765+</para><para arch="not-s390">
766
767 A <quote>---</quote> in the boot options has special meaning. Kernel
768 parameters that appear after the last <quote>---</quote> may be copied
769@@ -383,10 +401,20 @@
770 (crash). (For earlier kernels, these numbers were lower.)
771
772 </para></note>
773+
774+<note arch="s390"><para>
775+
776+The &debian-lc;.parmfile is limited to 11 lines only, each 80 characters long.
777+(The precise limit is 11 lines with each * 80 characters plus additional 10 characters.)
778+Hence it's recommended to try specifying more than just one parameter per line, separate parameters by single spaces and use as much (shortened) aliases as possible. But do not specify a single parameter (incl. it's value) across multiple lines!
779+The case of the parameter as well as the sequence don't matter.
780+
781+</para></note>
782+
783 <para>
784
785 For most installations some of the default options in your bootloader
786-configuration file, like <literal>vga=normal</literal>, may be safely
787+configuration file<phrase arch="not-s390">, like <literal>vga=normal</literal>,</phrase> may be safely
788 removed which may allow you to add more options for preseeding.
789
790 </para>
791@@ -402,7 +430,7 @@
792 <title>Auto mode</title>
793 <para>
794
795-There are several features of &debian; Installer that combine to allow
796+There are several features of the &debian; Installer that combine to allow
797 fairly simple command lines at the boot prompt to result in
798 arbitrarily complex customized automatic installs.
799
800@@ -507,10 +535,10 @@
801
802 </para><para>
803
804-The <literal>auto</literal> boot choice is not yet defined on all arches.
805-The same effect may be achieved by simply adding the two
806-parameters <literal>auto=true priority=critical</literal> to the kernel
807-command line. The <literal>auto</literal> kernel parameter is an alias for
808+The <literal>auto</literal> boot choice is not yet defined on all arches<phrase arch="s390"> (like on &architecture;)</phrase>,
809+but the same effect may be achieved by simply adding the two
810+parameters <literal>auto=true priority=critical</literal> to the kernel command line.
811+The <literal>auto</literal> kernel parameter is an alias for
812 <literal>auto-install/enable</literal> and setting it to
813 <literal>true</literal> delays the
814 locale and keyboard questions until after there has been a chance to
815@@ -599,14 +627,15 @@
816 }
817 </screen></informalexample>
818
819-<para>
820+<note><para>
821
822-Note that the above example limits this filename to DHCP clients that identify
823+The above example limits this filename to DHCP clients that identify
824 themselves as "d-i", so it will not affect regular DHCP clients, but only
825 the installer. You can also put the text in a stanza for only one particular
826 host to avoid preseeding all installs on your network.
827
828-</para><para>
829+</para></note>
830+<para>
831
832 A good way to use the DHCP preseeding is to only preseed values specific to
833 your network, such as the &debian; mirror to use. This way installs on your
834@@ -880,9 +909,13 @@
835 # netcfg will choose an interface that has link if possible. This makes it
836 # skip displaying a list if there is more than one interface.
837 d-i netcfg/choose_interface select auto
838-
839-# To pick a particular interface instead:
840-#d-i netcfg/choose_interface select eth1
841+<phrase arch="not-s390"># To pick a particular interface instead:
842+#d-i netcfg/choose_interface select eth1</phrase>
843+<phrase arch="s390"># Activate QETH devices (&architecture;-specific OSA adapters or Hipersockets)
844+#d-i s390-netdevice/choose_networktype string qeth
845+#d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/choose string 0.0.c000-0.0.c001-0.0.c002
846+#d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/layer2 boolean true
847+#d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/port string 0</phrase>
848
849 # To set a different link detection timeout (default is 3 seconds).
850 # Values are interpreted as seconds.
851@@ -1124,6 +1157,29 @@
852
853 </sect2>
854
855+ <sect2 id="s390-disk-storage">
856+ <title>&arch-title; specific disk storage</title>
857+
858+<para>
859+The &architecture; offers two unique kinds of disk storage - DASD and FCP (or zFCP).
860+
861+</para>
862+
863+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
864+# Activate DASD disks
865+#d-i s390-dasd/dasd string 0.0.0200,0.0.0300,0.0.0400
866+
867+# DASD configuration; by default dasdfmt (low-level format) if needed
868+#d-i s390-dasd/auto-format boolean true
869+#d-i s390-dasd/force-format boolean true
870+
871+# zFCP activation and configuration
872+# d-i s390-zfcp/zfcp string 0.0.1b34:0x400870075678a1b2:0x201480c800000000, \
873+# 0.0.1b34:0x400870075679a1b2:0x201480c800000000
874+</screen></informalexample>
875+
876+ </sect2>
877+
878 <sect2 id="preseed-partman">
879 <title>Partitioning</title>
880 <para>
881@@ -1636,6 +1692,277 @@
882 </screen></informalexample>
883
884 </sect2>
885+
886+ <sect2 id="s390x-specific-preseed-details" arch="s390">
887+ <title>Further &arch-title;-specific Preseed Details</title>
888+
889+<para>
890+
891+Since the &architecture; comes with it's unique CCW IO-layer,
892+it's architecture-specific devices that are based uppon CCW require special preseed settings,
893+that have a <quote>s390-</quote> prefix.
894+But these settings can also be specified as boot parameters, in this case just without the prefix.
895+
896+</para><para>
897+
898+All &architecture;-specific preseed settings are prefixed with "s390-...".
899+</para><para>
900+With the help of these settings you can even preseed early questions like about the qeth network devices.
901+</para><para>
902+The best way to look them up is the full list of debconf templates that available <ulink url="https://salsa.debian.org/installer-team">here</ulink>.
903+<!-- former link: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/d-i/ -->
904+</para><para>
905+Especially the following templates:
906+</para>
907+<itemizedlist><listitem><para>
908+QETH network devices, see: <ulink url="https://salsa.debian.org/installer-team/s390-netdevice/blob/master/debian/s390-netdevice.templates">s390-netdevice Templates</ulink>
909+<!-- former link: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/d-i/s390-netdevice.git/plain/debian/s390-netdevice.templates -->
910+</para></listitem>
911+<listitem><para>
912+DASD disk devices, see: <ulink url="https://salsa.debian.org/installer-team/s390-dasd/blob/master/debian/s390-dasd.templates">s390-dasd Templates</ulink>
913+<!-- former link: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/d-i/s390-dasd.git/plain/debian/s390-dasd.templates -->
914+</para></listitem>
915+<listitem><para>
916+zFCP disk devices, see: <ulink url="https://salsa.debian.org/installer-team/s390-zfcp/blob/master/debian/s390-zfcp.templates">s390-dasd Templates</ulink>
917+<!-- former link: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/d-i/s390-zfcp.git/plain/debian/s390-zfcp.templates -->
918+</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
919+
920+<para>
921+The following tables show the most relevant s390-specific boot parameters:
922+</para>
923+
924+<para>
925+Table: s390-netdevice parameters
926+<informaltable>
927+<tgroup cols="3">
928+<thead>
929+<row>
930+ <entry>Key</entry>
931+ <entry>Value</entry>
932+ <entry>Description</entry>
933+</row>
934+</thead>
935+<tbody>
936+<row>
937+ <entry>s390-netdevice/choose_networktype</entry>
938+ <entry>selection; choices: ctc, qeth, iucv, virtio</entry>
939+ <entry>Network device type</entry>
940+</row><row>
941+ <entry>s390-netdevice/ctc/protocol</entry>
942+ <entry>selection, choices: S/390 (0), Linux (1), OS/390 (3); default: S/390 (0)</entry>
943+ <entry>Protocol for this connection</entry>
944+</row><row>
945+ <entry>s390-netdevice/qeth/choose</entry>
946+ <entry>selection, choices: {choices}</entry>
947+ <entry>OSA-Express QDIO or Hipersockets device</entry>
948+</row><row>
949+ <entry>s390-netdevice/qeth/port</entry>
950+ <entry>string, default: 0</entry>
951+ <entry>Relative Port</entry>
952+</row><row>
953+ <entry>s390-netdevice/qeth/layer2</entry>
954+ <entry>boolean, default: false</entry>
955+ <entry>Device in layer2 mode</entry>
956+</row><row>
957+ <entry>s390-netdevice/iucv/peer</entry>
958+ <entry>string</entry>
959+ <entry>Name of VM peer</entry>
960+</row>
961+</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
962+</para>
963+
964+<para>
965+Table: s390-dasd parameters
966+<informaltable>
967+<tgroup cols="3">
968+<thead>
969+<row>
970+ <entry>Key</entry>
971+ <entry>Value</entry>
972+ <entry>Description</entry>
973+</row>
974+</thead>
975+<tbody>
976+<row>
977+ <entry>s390-dasd/dasd</entry>
978+ <entry>string</entry>
979+ <entry>one or more DASD devices using comma ',' to separate multiple entries; complete dasd device number, incl. leading zeros, separated by dots '.'</entry>
980+</row><row>
981+ <entry>s390-dasd/auto_format</entry>
982+ <entry>boolean</entry>
983+ <entry>format DASD device automatically in case it is not low-level formatted</entry>
984+</row><row>
985+ <entry>s390-dasd/force_format</entry>
986+ <entry>boolean</entry>
987+ <entry>force DASD device format even in case it was already low-level formatted</entry>
988+</row>
989+</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
990+</para>
991+
992+<para>
993+Table: s390-zfcp parameters
994+<informaltable>
995+<tgroup cols="3">
996+<thead>
997+<row>
998+ <entry>Key</entry>
999+ <entry>Value</entry>
1000+ <entry>Description</entry>
1001+</row>
1002+</thead>
1003+<tbody>
1004+<row>
1005+ <entry>s390-zfcp/zfcp</entry>
1006+ <entry>string</entry>
1007+ <entry>one or more SCSI devices using comma ',' to separate multiple entries; each entry consists of a zfcp host adapter, optionally followed by the WWPN and LUN, like: 0.0.1234,0.0.5678:0x2005000e11159c32:0x1234567800000000</entry>
1008+</row>
1009+</tbody></tgroup></informaltable>
1010+</para>
1011+
1012+ <sect3 id="s390x-preseed-example" arch="s390">
1013+ <title>&arch-title; Preseed Example</title>
1014+
1015+<para>
1016+
1017+This example shows a typical preseed configuration for a &architecture; system.
1018+In such environments static networks are more common that dynamic ones.
1019+For doing the network configuration at an early stage at least some of the s390-netdevice settings need to be used as boot parameters in the parmfile.
1020+
1021+</para><para>
1022+
1023+The preseed configuration file can be located on a ftp, tftp or http server or it can be included in the root directory of the initrd. If there is already a ftp server setup for ftp-based network installation, the same system can be used as preseed server. This would also ensure that the preseed file is accessible during boot and install time at the same system. In case the Ubuntu servers have no direct connection to the internet, the public update server can't be directly used, hence the install and preseed system may even act a local archive mirror. In case of a non-interactive installetion with dynamic network some additional resources are obviously needed, like DHCP and DNS.
1024+
1025+</para><para>
1026+
1027+Here is a set of boot parameters that can be put into the <filename>&debian-lc;.parmfile</filename>.
1028+It's using as much aliases as possible to keep it compact:
1029+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1030+ro locale=en_US auto=true priority=critical s390-netdevice/choose_networktype=qeth s390-netdevice/qeth/choose=0.0.c000-0.0.c001-0.0.c002 s390-netdevice/qeth/layer2=true s390-netdevice/qeth/port=0 netcfg/get_ipaddress=10.245.236.42 netcfg/get_netmask=255.255.255.0 netcfg/get_gateway=10.245.236.1 netcfg/get_nameservers=10.245.236.1 netdevice/qeth/layer2=true netcfg/confirm_static=true netcfg/disable_dhcp=true netcfg/use_autoconfig=1 netcfg/get_hostname=ZLIN42 netcfg/get_domain=canonical.com url=http://install-server/ubuntu/s390x/preseed.cfg
1031+</screen></informalexample>
1032+
1033+</para><para>
1034+
1035+In case the parmfile is used on z/VM and is located there as <filename>&debian-lc; parmfile</filename> on a Minidisk, please remember the file requirements (mode <command>binary</command> / <command>bin</command>, FTP option <command>locsite fix 80</command> and max. 11 lines with each 80 characters + additional 10 characters).
1036+
1037+</para><para>
1038+
1039+Especially on LPAR installation it's worth to consider using the cio_ignore parameter to hide some of the devices from Linux, which may speedup the boot and install process significantly.
1040+
1041+</para><para>
1042+
1043+IPv6 addresses of servers hosting preseed configuration files are possible.
1044+
1045+</para><para>
1046+
1047+The second part is the preseed.cfg file itself.
1048+
1049+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1050+#
1051+# Sample s390x pressed with static qeth network and DASD disk
1052+# fcp is included as comment
1053+# ftp://server/preseed/preseed.cfg
1054+#
1055+
1056+d-i debconf/priority string critical
1057+d-i auto-install/enable boolean true
1058+
1059+# use -proposed udebs
1060+d-i apt-setup/proposed boolean false
1061+
1062+d-i pkgsel/update-policy select unattended-upgrades
1063+
1064+# localization
1065+d-i debian-installer/language string en
1066+d-i debian-installer/country string US
1067+d-i debian-installer/locale string en_US.UTF-8
1068+
1069+# activate qeth
1070+d-i s390-netdevice/choose_networktype string qeth
1071+d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/choose string 0.0.c000-0.0.c001-0.0.c002
1072+d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/layer2 boolean true
1073+d-i s390-netdevice/qeth/port string 0
1074+
1075+# use static network configuration
1076+d-i netcfg/choose_interface select auto
1077+d-i netcfg/disable_autoconfig boolean true
1078+
1079+d-i netcfg/get_ipaddress string 10.245.236.42
1080+d-i netcfg/get_netmask string 255.255.255.0
1081+d-i netcfg/get_gateway string 10.245.236.1
1082+d-i netcfg/get_nameservers string 10.245.236.1
1083+d-i netcfg/confirm_static boolean true
1084+d-i netcfg/hostname string ZLIN42
1085+
1086+# provide network-console password
1087+d-i network-console/password password pass4install
1088+d-i network-console/password-again password pass4install
1089+d-i network-console/start note
1090+
1091+# user setup
1092+d-i passwd/user-fullname string ubuntu
1093+d-i passwd/username string ubuntu
1094+d-i passwd/user-password-crypted password $6czoUlkH40NHPJs5.5wdF.kIJFu33VdH0kNMTF$$$QFT6DumGdp5PNjlnnxowinu6tcztRC.
1095+
1096+d-i user-setup/encrypt-home boolean false
1097+
1098+# enable shadow passwords
1099+d-i passwd/shadow boolean true
1100+
1101+# hw clock
1102+d-i clock-setup/utc boolean true
1103+# time zone
1104+d-i time/zone string US/Eastern
1105+
1106+# release to install
1107+d-i mirror/suite string bionic
1108+
1109+# do not enable live installer, use normal instead
1110+d-i live-installer/enable boolean false
1111+
1112+# activate DASD, dasdfmt if needed
1113+d-i s390-dasd/dasd string 0.0.0200,0.0.0300,0.0.0400
1114+
1115+# DASD configuration
1116+d-i s390-dasd/auto-format boolean true
1117+d-i s390-dasd/force-format boolean true
1118+
1119+# zFCP configuration
1120+# d-i s390-zfcp/zfcp string
1121+# 0.0.2b12:0x400807704798b4a4:0x201480c800000000
1122+
1123+# optional lines to overwrite old RAIDs and LVMs ....
1124+# d-i partman-md/device_remove_md boolean true
1125+# d-i partman-lvm/device_remove_lvm boolean true
1126+# d-i partman-lvm/confirm boolean true
1127+# d-i partman-lvm/confirm_nooverwrite boolean true
1128+
1129+# auto-partition, all files in one partition
1130+d-i partman-auto/method string regular
1131+d-i partman-auto/choose_recipe select atomic
1132+d-i partman/choose_partition select finish
1133+d-i partman/confirm_nooverwrite boolean true
1134+d-i partman/confirm boolean true
1135+
1136+# software selection
1137+d-i tasksel/first multiselect standard system utilities, OpenSSH server, Basic Ubuntu server
1138+
1139+# after installation, install some packages - use only one line!
1140+d-i preseed/late_command string in-target sed -i s/prohibit-password/yes/g /etc/ssh/sshd_config; apt-install initramfs-tools screen strace vim
1141+
1142+# reboot at the end
1143+d-i finish-install/reboot_in_progress note
1144+</screen></informalexample>
1145+
1146+Further excellent examples can be found at the
1147+<ulink url="http://www.vm.ibm.com/education/lvc/zlinlvc.html">IBM Live Virtual Class</ulink> portal
1148+in session <ulink url="http://www.vm.ibm.com/education/lvc/LVC0803.pdf">Fully Automated Installation of Ubuntu Server 16.04 with preseed</ulink>.
1149+It contains disk configurations examples for two DASDs with LVM, two FCP SCSI LUNs with LVM, a single DASD, a qcow2 image file and a single FCP SCSI disk.
1150+</para>
1151+
1152+ </sect3>
1153+
1154+ </sect2>
1155+
1156 </sect1>
1157
1158
1159@@ -1780,5 +2107,6 @@
1160 </para>
1161
1162 </sect2>
1163+
1164 </sect1>
1165 </appendix>
1166
1167=== modified file 'en/boot-installer/intro-firmware.xml'
1168--- en/boot-installer/intro-firmware.xml 2013-10-08 22:00:29 +0000
1169+++ en/boot-installer/intro-firmware.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1170@@ -7,7 +7,8 @@
1171 flash chip on the device. The installer can be written to flash so it will
1172 automatically start when you reboot your machines.
1173
1174-</para><note><para>
1175+</para>
1176+<note><para>
1177
1178 In most cases, changing the firmware of an embedded device voids your
1179 warranty. Sometimes you are also not able to recover your device if there
1180
1181=== modified file 'en/boot-installer/trouble.xml'
1182--- en/boot-installer/trouble.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
1183+++ en/boot-installer/trouble.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1184@@ -538,13 +538,15 @@
1185 successful, so that we can get as much information as possible on the largest
1186 number of hardware configurations.
1187
1188-</para><note condition="not-ubuntu"><para>
1189+</para>
1190+<note condition="not-ubuntu"><para>
1191
1192 Your installation report will be published in the Debian Bug
1193 Tracking System (BTS) and forwarded to a public mailing list. Make sure that
1194 you use an e-mail address that you do not mind being made public.
1195
1196-</para></note><para>
1197+</para></note>
1198+<para>
1199
1200 If you have a working &debian; system, the easiest way to send an installation
1201 report is to install the <classname>installation-report</classname> and
1202
1203=== added file 'en/hardware/disk-storage.xml'
1204--- en/hardware/disk-storage.xml 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000
1205+++ en/hardware/disk-storage.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1206@@ -0,0 +1,36 @@
1207+<!-- retain these comments for translator revision tracking -->
1208+<!-- $Id: disk-storage.xml 69111 2014-03-19 19:27:26Z merker $ -->
1209+
1210+ <sect2 id="disk-storage" arch="s390">
1211+ <title>Disk Storage on &arch-title;</title>
1212+<para>
1213+
1214+The &arch-title; platform provides two unique storage types:
1215+
1216+</para>
1217+
1218+<variablelist>
1219+ <varlistentry>
1220+
1221+ <term>DASD</term>
1222+ <listitem>
1223+
1224+ &module-s390-dasd.xml;
1225+
1226+ </listitem>
1227+
1228+ </varlistentry>
1229+ <varlistentry>
1230+
1231+ <term>FCP</term>
1232+
1233+ <listitem>
1234+
1235+ &module-s390-fcp.xml;
1236+
1237+ </listitem>
1238+ </varlistentry>
1239+</variablelist>
1240+
1241+ </sect2>
1242+
1243
1244=== modified file 'en/hardware/hardware-supported.xml'
1245--- en/hardware/hardware-supported.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
1246+++ en/hardware/hardware-supported.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1247@@ -154,15 +154,15 @@
1248 -->
1249
1250 <row condition="not-ubuntu">
1251- <entry>64bit IBM S/390</entry>
1252- <entry>s390x</entry>
1253+ <entry>64bit IBM &arch-title;</entry>
1254+ <entry>&architecture;</entry>
1255 <entry>IPL from VM-reader and DASD</entry>
1256 <entry>generic</entry>
1257 </row>
1258
1259 <row> <!-- FIXME: no option to limit text to ubuntu only ! There is no such thing like condition="not-debian" -->
1260 <entry>IBM z/Architecture</entry>
1261- <entry>s390x</entry>
1262+ <entry>&architecture;</entry>
1263 <entry>IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE, no s390 (31-bit mode) support</entry>
1264 <entry>zEC12 and newer machines</entry>
1265 </row>
1266@@ -395,6 +395,7 @@
1267
1268 &network-cards.xml;
1269 &accessibility-hardware.xml;
1270+&disk-storage.xml;
1271 &supported-peripherals.xml;
1272
1273 </sect1>
1274
1275=== modified file 'en/howto/installation-howto.xml'
1276--- en/howto/installation-howto.xml 2018-05-15 18:04:14 +0000
1277+++ en/howto/installation-howto.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1278@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@
1279
1280 For more information on where to get CDs, see <xref linkend="official-cdrom" />.
1281
1282-</para><para>
1283+</para><para arch="not-s390">
1284
1285 Some installation methods require other images than CD images.
1286 <phrase condition="unofficial-build">
1287@@ -48,15 +48,24 @@
1288 <xref linkend="where-files" /> explains how to find images on &debian;
1289 mirrors.
1290
1291-</para><para>
1292-
1293-The subsections below will give the details about which images you should
1294+</para><para arch="s390">
1295+
1296+The installation on &architecture; requires at least an installer kernel and initrd file.
1297+This is usually be taken from the <phrase arch="s390"><ulink url="&url-ubuntu-download-s390x;">Official &ubuntu; CD-ROM image</ulink></phrase> (see the ./boot folder) or can be directly downloaded from the &debian; archive page - either the version from <ulink url="http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports/dists/&releasename;/main/installer-s390x/">main</ulink> or (if available) a version from the <ulink url="http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports/dists/&releasename;-updates/main/installer-s390x/">updates</ulink> pocket.
1298+
1299+</para><para>
1300+
1301+The easiest way is probably to download the (CDROM) image, because the files most people need are there on the image.
1302+
1303+</para><para>
1304+
1305+The subsections below will give the details about which image(s) you should
1306 get for each possible means of installation.
1307
1308 </para>
1309
1310 <sect2 id="howto-getting-images-cdrom">
1311- <title>CDROM</title>
1312+ <title>Booting from CDROM</title>
1313
1314 <para condition="not-ubuntu">
1315
1316@@ -70,7 +79,17 @@
1317
1318 </para><para>
1319
1320-Download the image for your architecture and burn it to a CD.
1321+First of all download the image for your architecture and burn it to a CD/DVD.
1322+
1323+</para><para arch="s390">In case you are going to do an installation on &architecture; from CD/DVD-ROM, put the CD/DVD into the HMC's CD/DVD drive and execute the HMC task <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem> for the installation and select <guimenuitem>Hardware Management Console CD/DVD-ROM...</guimenuitem>.
1324+
1325+</para><para arch="s390">
1326+
1327+The installation from a USB drive on &architecture; is very similar (and not comparable to other architectures).
1328+In such a case just copy the image to a USB drive, plug it into the HMC, execute the HMC task <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem> and select <guimenuitem>Hardware Management Console USB flash memory drive...</guimenuitem> - keep in mind that the USB drive needs to be already inserted before you execute the task, otherwise the USB drive option(s) are not listed.
1329+
1330+</para><para>
1331+
1332 <phrase arch="any-x86">To boot the CD, you may need to change your BIOS
1333 configuration, as explained in <xref linkend="bios-setup" />.</phrase>
1334 <phrase arch="powerpc">
1335@@ -171,8 +190,8 @@
1336
1337 It's also possible to boot the &ubuntu; installer completely from the net. The
1338 various methods to netboot depend on your architecture and netboot setup.
1339-The files in <filename>netboot/</filename> can be used to netboot the &ubuntu;
1340-installer.
1341+<phrase arch="not-s390">The files in <filename>netboot/</filename> can be used to netboot the &ubuntu;
1342+installer.</phrase>
1343
1344 </para><para arch="x86">
1345
1346@@ -184,12 +203,46 @@
1347 everything will just work.
1348 For detailed instructions, see <xref linkend="install-tftp" />.
1349
1350+</para><para arch="s390">
1351+
1352+Booting the installer from network is on the &architecture; platform quite flexible and convinient, hence the recommended way.
1353+But some initial steps are required.
1354+The CD/DVD image needs to be extracted and made available via FTP.
1355+It's crucial that the FTP server itself is reachable by the HMC, the SE and the LPAR or z/VM guest to be installed.
1356+A dedicated network is usually setup just for this purpose.
1357+Once this infrastructure is in place the booting of the installer from FTP can be started with the execution of the HMC task <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem>, selecting <guimenuitem>FTP Source</guimenuitem> and specifying <guimenuitem>Host Computer</guimenuitem> (usually specified by IP address), <guimenuitem>User ID</guimenuitem>, <guimenuitem>Password</guimenuitem>, <guimenuitem>Account (optional)</guimenuitem> and <guimenuitem>File location (optional)</guimenuitem>.
1358+Anonymous FTP is possible, too.
1359+
1360 </para>
1361 </sect2>
1362
1363- <sect2 arch="linux-any" id="howto-getting-images-hard-disk" condition="not-ubuntu">
1364- <title>Booting from hard disk</title>
1365-<para>
1366+ <sect2 arch="linux-any" id="howto-getting-images-hard-disk"> <!-- FIXME: nothing like condition="not-debian" or condition="ubuntu-only" supported, yet -->
1367+ <title>Booting from CMS disk (z/VM)</title>
1368+<para arch="s390">
1369+
1370+On z/VM the usual way to boot the installer is to use the (virtual) puncher.
1371+At least the files <filename>initrd.&debian-lc;</filename> and <filename>kernel.&debian-lc;</filename> are needed.
1372+These files need to be carefully transfered to a z/VM CMS disk using mode <command>binary</command> / <command>bin</command> and the FTP option <command>locsite fix 80</command>.
1373+</para><para>
1374+It's recommended to download <filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename> and <filename>&debian-lc;.exec</filename> as well, but using <command>ascii</command> mode.
1375+</para><para>
1376+Properly transfered to CMS, the installation files can be booted by just executing the <filename>&debian-lc;.exec</filename> REXX script.
1377+Alternatively you can also execute the steps from the script manually.
1378+ <informalexample role="example"><screen>
1379+/* REXX EXEC TO IPL Ubuntu for */
1380+/* z Systems FROM THE VM READER. */
1381+/* */
1382+'CP CLOSE RDR'
1383+'PURGE RDR ALL'
1384+'SPOOL PUNCH * RDR'
1385+'PUNCH KERNEL UBUNTU * (NOHEADER'
1386+'PUNCH PARMFILE UBUNTU * (NOHEADER'
1387+'PUNCH INITRD UBUNTU * (NOHEADER'
1388+'CHANGE RDR ALL KEEP NOHOLD'
1389+'CP IPL 000C CLEAR'
1390+</screen></informalexample>
1391+
1392+</para><para arch="not-s390" condition="not-ubuntu">
1393
1394 It's possible to boot the installer using no removable media, but just an
1395 existing hard disk, which can have a different OS on it. Download
1396@@ -229,7 +282,7 @@
1397 </para><para>
1398
1399 Now sit back while the installer detects some of your hardware, and
1400-loads the rest of itself from CD, floppy, USB, etc.
1401+loads the rest of itself from CD, USB<phrase condition="bootable-usb">, floppy</phrase><phrase arch="s390">, network</phrase>, etc.
1402
1403 </para><para>
1404
1405@@ -246,11 +299,14 @@
1406
1407 </para><para>
1408
1409-Setting up your clock and time zone is followed by the creation of user accounts. By
1410-default you are asked to provide a password for the <quote>root</quote>
1411+Setting up your clock and time zone is followed by the creation of user accounts.
1412+
1413+By default you are asked to provide a password for the <quote>root</quote>
1414 (administrator) account and information necessary to create one regular user
1415-account. If you do not specify a password for the <quote>root</quote> user this
1416-account will be disabled but the <command>sudo</command> package will be installed
1417+account. If you choose <quote>No</quote> on the
1418+<guimenuitem>Allow login as root?</guimenuitem> question or if you
1419+do not specify a password for the <quote>root</quote> user this account
1420+will be disabled, but the <command>sudo</command> package will be installed
1421 later to enable administrative tasks to be carried out on the new system.
1422
1423 </para><para>
1424@@ -273,9 +329,11 @@
1425 If you want to customize the partition layout, choose <guimenuitem>Manually
1426 edit partition table</guimenuitem> from the menu, and
1427 the next screen will show you your partition table, how the partitions will
1428-be formatted, and where they will be mounted. Select a partition to modify or
1429-delete it. Remember to assign at least one partition
1430-for swap space and to mount a partition on <filename>/</filename>.
1431+be formatted, and where they will be mounted.
1432+Select a partition to modify or delete it.
1433+Remember that since 18.04 a swap file is the default, rather than a swap partition.
1434+But you are still able to assign a partition for swap space.
1435+Remember to mount one partition on <filename>/</filename> (root).
1436 For more detailed information on how to use the partitioner, please refer
1437 to <xref linkend="di-partition" />; the appendix <xref
1438 linkend="partitioning" /> has more general information about
1439@@ -315,7 +373,7 @@
1440 </para><para>
1441
1442 The installer will now tell you that the first stage of installation has
1443-finished. Remove the CD and hit &enterkey; to reboot
1444+finished. Remove the CD (if needed) and hit &enterkey; to reboot
1445 your machine. It should boot up into the newly installed system and
1446 allow you to log in. This is explained in <xref linkend="boot-new"/>.
1447
1448
1449=== modified file 'en/install-methods/usb-setup/x86.xml'
1450--- en/install-methods/usb-setup/x86.xml 2016-01-26 07:14:43 +0000
1451+++ en/install-methods/usb-setup/x86.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1452@@ -8,7 +8,8 @@
1453 We will show how to set up the memory stick to use the first partition,
1454 instead of the entire device.
1455
1456-</para><note><para>
1457+</para>
1458+<note><para>
1459
1460 Since most USB sticks come pre-configured with a single FAT16
1461 partition, you probably won't have to repartition or reformat the
1462@@ -36,7 +37,8 @@
1463 <command>mkdosfs</command> command is contained in the
1464 <classname>dosfstools</classname> &debian; package.
1465
1466-</para></note><para>
1467+</para></note>
1468+<para>
1469
1470 In order to start the kernel after booting from the USB stick, we will
1471 put a boot loader on the stick. Although any boot loader
1472
1473=== modified file 'en/partitioning/device-names.xml'
1474--- en/partitioning/device-names.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
1475+++ en/partitioning/device-names.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1476@@ -11,13 +11,13 @@
1477 and mount partitions. Here's the basic naming scheme:
1478
1479 </para>
1480-<itemizedlist arch="not-s390">
1481-<listitem><para>
1482+<itemizedlist>
1483+<listitem arch="not-s390"><para>
1484
1485 The first floppy drive is named <filename>/dev/fd0</filename>.
1486
1487 </para></listitem>
1488-<listitem><para>
1489+<listitem arch="not-s390"><para>
1490
1491 The second floppy drive is named <filename>/dev/fd1</filename>.
1492
1493@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
1494 and so on.
1495
1496 </para></listitem>
1497-<listitem><para>
1498+<listitem arch="not-s390"><para>
1499
1500 The first SCSI CD-ROM is named <filename>/dev/scd0</filename>, also
1501 known as <filename>/dev/sr0</filename>.
1502@@ -41,7 +41,8 @@
1503 </para></listitem>
1504 </itemizedlist>
1505
1506-<itemizedlist arch="s390">
1507+<para arch="s390">
1508+<itemizedlist>
1509 <listitem><para>
1510
1511 The first DASD device is named
1512@@ -56,14 +57,31 @@
1513 </para></listitem>
1514 </itemizedlist>
1515
1516-<para arch="not-s390">
1517+After dasdz, the naming starts over with dasdaa, dasdab, ... up to dasdzz.
1518+</para>
1519+
1520+<para arch="s390">
1521
1522 The partitions on each disk are represented by appending a decimal
1523+number to the disk name: <filename>dasda1</filename> and
1524+<filename>dasda2</filename> represent the first and
1525+second partitions of the first DASD device in your system.
1526+
1527+</para>
1528+
1529+<para>
1530+
1531+<phrase arch="s390">From a Linux operating system point of view a SCSI/FCP disk looks like and behaves just like a normal SCSI disk. However they are almost always setup in a highly available way using multipath.
1532+</phrase>
1533+
1534+The partitions on each SCSI disk are represented by appending a decimal
1535 number to the disk name: <filename>sda1</filename> and
1536 <filename>sda2</filename> represent the first and
1537 second partitions of the first SCSI disk drive in your system.
1538
1539-</para><para arch="not-s390">
1540+</para>
1541+
1542+<para arch="not-s390">
1543
1544 Here is a real-life example. Let's assume you have a system with 2
1545 SCSI disks, one at SCSI address 2 and the other at SCSI address 4.
1546@@ -74,14 +92,18 @@
1547 <filename>sda3</filename>. The same applies to the
1548 <filename>sdb</filename> disk and its partitions.
1549
1550-</para><para arch="not-s390">
1551+</para>
1552+
1553+<para>
1554
1555 Note that if you have two SCSI host bus adapters (i.e., controllers),
1556 the order of the drives can get confusing. The best solution in this
1557 case is to watch the boot messages, assuming you know the drive models
1558 and/or capacities.
1559
1560-</para><para arch="x86">
1561+</para>
1562+
1563+<para arch="x86">
1564
1565 Linux represents the primary partitions as the drive name, plus the
1566 numbers 1 through 4. For example, the first primary partition on the
1567@@ -91,19 +113,15 @@
1568 partition, that is, the primary partition holding the logical
1569 partitions, is not usable by itself.
1570
1571-</para><para arch="sparc">
1572+</para>
1573+
1574+<para arch="sparc">
1575
1576 Sun disk partitions allow for 8 separate partitions (or slices). The
1577 third partition is usually (and is preferred to have) the <quote>Whole
1578 Disk</quote> partition. This partition references all of the sectors of the
1579 disk, and is used by the boot loader (either SILO, or Sun's).
1580
1581-</para><para arch="s390">
1582-
1583-The partitions on each disk are represented by appending a decimal
1584-number to the disk name: <filename>dasda1</filename> and
1585-<filename>dasda2</filename> represent the first and
1586-second partitions of the first DASD device in your system.
1587-
1588 </para>
1589+
1590 </sect1>
1591
1592=== modified file 'en/partitioning/partition-programs.xml'
1593--- en/partitioning/partition-programs.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
1594+++ en/partitioning/partition-programs.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1595@@ -99,9 +99,9 @@
1596 <listitem><para>
1597
1598 &arch-title; version of <command>fdisk</command>; Please read the
1599-fdasd manual page or chapter 13 in
1600-<ulink url="http://oss.software.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/linux390/docu/l390dd08.pdf">
1601-Device Drivers and Installation Commands</ulink> for details.
1602+IBM Linux on Z and LinuxONE s390-tools overview and find the fdasd section there
1603+<ulink url="https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/linux390/s390-tools-overview.html">
1604+s390-tools overview</ulink> for further details.
1605
1606 </para></listitem>
1607 </varlistentry>
1608@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@
1609
1610 One of these programs will be run by default when you select
1611 <guimenuitem>Partition disks</guimenuitem> (or similar). It may be possible
1612-to use a different partitioning tool from the command line on VT2, but this
1613+to use a different partitioning tool<phrase arch="not-s390"> from the command line on VT2</phrase>, but this
1614 is not recommended.
1615
1616 </para><para arch="any-x86">Remember to mark your boot partition as
1617
1618=== modified file 'en/partitioning/schemes.xml'
1619--- en/partitioning/schemes.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
1620+++ en/partitioning/schemes.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1621@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
1622 <para>
1623
1624 For new users, personal &debian; boxes, home systems, and other
1625-single-user setups, a single <filename>/</filename> partition (plus
1626+single-user setups, a single <filename>/</filename> partition (possibly plus a separate
1627 swap) is probably the easiest, simplest way to go. However, if your
1628 partition is larger than around 6GB, choose ext3 as your partition
1629 type. Ext2 partitions need periodic file system integrity checking,
1630
1631=== modified file 'en/partitioning/sizing.xml'
1632--- en/partitioning/sizing.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
1633+++ en/partitioning/sizing.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1634@@ -13,9 +13,9 @@
1635 strictly true. <phrase><!-- FIXME: nothing like condition="not-debian" or condition="ubuntu-only" supported, yet -->In fact, since Ubuntu 18.04 a swap file rather than a swap partition is now used by default.</phrase>
1636 <quote>Swap</quote> is scratch space for an operating system,
1637 which allows the system to use disk storage as <quote>virtual
1638-memory</quote>. By putting swap on a separate partition, &arch-kernel; can make much
1639-more efficient use of it. <!-- the following no longer applies to Ubuntu 18.04 - see above --> <!-->It is possible to force &arch-kernel; to use a
1640-regular file as swap, but it is not recommended.</-->
1641+memory</quote>.
1642+&arch-kernel; may use a separate swap partition more efficiently compared to a swap file, but on the other hand side a swap file wastes less disk space compared to a permanently allocated swap partition.
1643+<!-- the following no longer applies to Ubuntu 18.04 - see above --> <!-->It is possible to force &arch-kernel; to use a regular file as swap, but it is not recommended.</-->
1644
1645 </para><para>
1646
1647
1648=== modified file 'en/post-install/rescue.xml'
1649--- en/post-install/rescue.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
1650+++ en/post-install/rescue.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
1651@@ -13,30 +13,110 @@
1652 have a system to work from while you fix it, and rescue mode can be useful
1653 for this.
1654
1655-</para><para arch="not-s390">
1656-
1657-<!-- TODO: describe what to do on arches where this isn't set up in the
1658- bootloader -->
1659+</para><para>
1660+
1661+There are several options to rescue a broken &debian; system on &architecture;:
1662+
1663+</para>
1664+<itemizedlist>
1665+<listitem arch="not-s390"><para>
1666+<!-- TODO: describe what to do on arches where this isn't set up in the bootloader -->
1667
1668 To access rescue mode, select <userinput>rescue</userinput> from the
1669-boot menu, type <userinput>rescue</userinput> at the
1670-<prompt>boot:</prompt> prompt, or boot with the
1671-<userinput>rescue/enable=true</userinput> boot parameter. You'll be
1672-shown the first few screens of the installer, with a note in the
1673+boot menu (if available) or append the boot parameter <userinput>rescue</userinput>
1674+or <userinput>systemd.unit=emergency.target</userinput>
1675+to the <guimenuitem>linux</guimenuitem> kernel boot entry of the boot loader.
1676+
1677+</para><para>
1678+
1679+While booting the system enter the boot loader menu:
1680+
1681+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1682+ GNU GRUB version 2.02
1683+
1684+ ┌────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
1685+ │*Ubuntu │
1686+ │ Advanced options for Ubuntu │
1687+ │ │
1688+ │ │
1689+ │ │
1690+ │ │
1691+ │ │
1692+ │ │
1693+ │ │
1694+ │ │
1695+ │ │
1696+ │ │
1697+ │ │
1698+ └────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
1699+
1700+ Use the ↑ and ↓ keys to select which entry is highlighted.
1701+ Press enter to boot the selected OS, 'e' to edit the commands
1702+ before booting or 'c' for a command-line.
1703+</screen></informalexample>
1704+
1705+Then type <command>e</command> to edit the boot loader configuration and entries,
1706+navigate to your prefered Linux kernel line and append either
1707+<userinput>rescue</userinput> or <userinput>systemd.unit=emergency.target</userinput>.
1708+
1709+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1710+ GNU GRUB version 2.02
1711+
1712+ ┌────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
1713+ │ insmod ext2 │
1714+ │ set root='hd0,gpt2'or Ubuntu │
1715+ │ if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then │
1716+ │ search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,g\│
1717+ │pt2 --hint-efi=hd0,gpt2 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,gpt2 ea967ae0-7519-11eB-85b\│
1718+ │d-5254008bdef4 │
1719+ │ else │
1720+ │ search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ea967ae0-7519-11e\│
1721+ │8-85bd-5254008bdef4 │
1722+ │ fi │
1723+ │ echo 'Loading Linux 4.15.0-23-generic ...' │
1724+ │ linux /boot/vmlinuz-4.15.0-23-generic root=UUID=ea96\│
1725+ │7ae0-7519-11eB-85bd-5254008bdef4 ro maybe-ubiquity rescue │
1726+ └────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
1727+
1728+ Minimum Emacs-like screen editing is supported. TAB lists
1729+ completions. Press Ctrl-x or F10 to boot, Ctrl-c or F2 for
1730+ a command-line or ESC to discard edits and return to the GRUB menu.
1731+</screen></informalexample>
1732+
1733+Then press either Ctrl-x or F10 to boot with the modified entry
1734+and the system will enter the rescue mode.
1735+
1736+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1737+...
1738+[ OK ] Started Update UTMP about System Runlevel Changes.
1739+You are in rescue mode. After logging in, type "journalctl -xb" to view
1740+system logs, "systemctl reboot" to reboot, "systemctl default" or "exit"
1741+to boot into default mode.
1742+Press Enter for maintenance
1743+(or press Control-D to continue):
1744+root@ubuntu:~#
1745+</screen></informalexample>
1746+
1747+</para></listitem>
1748+
1749+<listitem arch="not-s390"><para>
1750+<!-- TODO: describe what to do on arches where this isn't set up in the bootloader -->
1751+
1752+Alternatively the installer can be booted with the <userinput>rescue=true</userinput> boot parameter. <!-- FIXME: Does this still apply for amd64, since there is subuquity on amd64? -->
1753+You'll be shown the first few screens of the installer, with a note in the
1754 corner of the display to indicate that this is rescue mode, not a full
1755 installation. Don't worry, your system is not about to be overwritten!
1756 Rescue mode simply takes advantage of the hardware detection
1757 facilities available in the installer to ensure that your disks,
1758-network devices, and so on are available to you while repairing your
1759-system.
1760-
1761-</para><para arch="s390">
1762-
1763-There are two options to rescue a broken &debian; on &architecture; system:
1764-
1765-</para><para arch="s390">
1766-
1767-First of all the zipl boot menu usually offers an option to boot an <guimenuitem>old</guimenuitem> kernel via the boot option number <guimenuitem>2</guimenuitem>.
1768+network devices, and so on are available to you while repairing your system.
1769+
1770+</para><para>
1771+
1772+</para></listitem>
1773+
1774+<listitem arch="s390"><para> <!-- FIXME: nothing like condition="not-debian" or condition="ubuntu-only" supported, yet -->
1775+
1776+The zipl boot menu offers by default an option to boot an <guimenuitem>old</guimenuitem> kernel via the boot option number <guimenuitem>2</guimenuitem>.
1777 <informalexample role="example"><screen>
1778 zIPL v2.3.0-build-20180425 interactive boot menu
1779
1780@@ -46,43 +126,213 @@
1781 2. old
1782 Please choose (default will boot in 10 seconds):
1783 </screen></informalexample>
1784-Boot problems are often introduced by a kernel change.
1785+Boot problems are often introduced with a kernel change.
1786 So there is a good chance that the prior / old kernel will still work.
1787
1788-</para><para arch="s390">
1789-
1790-The second option is to boot an installation kernel and select from the inital screen the <guimenuitem>Start shell</guimenuitem> entry.
1791-<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1792- ┌────────────────────────┤ [!!] Configuring d-i ├─────────────────────────┐
1793- │ │
1794- │ This is the network console for the Debian installer. From here, you │
1795- │ may start the Debian installer, or execute an interactive shell. │
1796- │ │
1797- │ To return to this menu, you will need to log in again. │
1798- │ │
1799- │ Network console option: │
1800- │ │
1801- │ Start installer │
1802- │ Start installer (expert mode) │
1803- │ Start shell │
1804- │ │
1805- └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
1806-</screen></informalexample>
1807-The functionality in the &d-i; shell is limited, however, it can still act as a rescue system to fix a broken installation.
1808-
1809-</para><para arch="not-s390">
1810-
1811+</para></listitem>
1812+<listitem arch="s390"><para> <!-- FIXME: nothing like condition="not-debian" or condition="ubuntu-only" supported, yet -->
1813+
1814+Another option is to use the installation kernel and initrd in it's rescue mode (sometimes also known as recovery mode).
1815+To activate the rescue mode, one needs to boot with the <quote>rescue/enable=true</quote> boot parameter,
1816+and this parameter needs to be added to the <filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename> file.
1817+This is slightly different for an LPAR compared to a z/VM guest.
1818+
1819+</para><para>
1820+For an LPAR change to the network install server, where the image got extracted and enter the image's ./boot folder.
1821+You can now just open the <filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename>, add the <quote>rescue/enable=true</quote> boot parameter
1822+and proceed like you would usually do for an LPAR installation, means with the HMC task
1823+<guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem>.
1824+</para><para>
1825+But at this point it's better to add a dedicated boot entry for the rescue mode.
1826+Therefore you need to copy the <filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename> and the <filename>&debian-lc;.ins</filename>
1827+to create seperate versions for the rescue mode which finally result in a separate rescue mode entry at the <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem> task:
1828+
1829+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1830+Login to your network boot (FTP) server.
1831+
1832+$ cd &lt;path to the extracted &debian-lc; server image&gt;/&debian-lc;-server-&release;/boot
1833+$ cp &debian-lc;.ins rescue.ins
1834+$ cp parmfile.&debian-lc; parmfile.rescue
1835+
1836+Change rescue.ins from it's default:
1837+$ cat rescue.ins
1838+* &debian; for z Series (default kernel)
1839+kernel.&debian-lc; 0x00000000
1840+initrd.off 0x0001040c
1841+initrd.siz 0x00010414
1842+parmfile.&debian-lc; 0x00010480
1843+initrd.&debian-lc; 0x01000000
1844+
1845+To the following:
1846+$ cat rescue.ins
1847+* &debian; for z Series (default kernel)
1848+kernel.&debian-lc; 0x00000000
1849+initrd.off 0x0001040c
1850+initrd.siz 0x00010414
1851+parmfile.rescue 0x00010480
1852+initrd.&debian-lc; 0x01000000
1853+
1854+And open parmfile.rescue and add <quote>rescue/enable=true</quote> (the parmfile is empty by default):
1855+$ cat parmfile.rescue
1856+rescue/enable=true
1857+</screen></informalexample>
1858+
1859+Now start the <guimenuitem>Load from Removable Media or Server</guimenuitem> task, select <guimenuitem>FTP source</guimenuitem>,
1860+enter the data of your network boot (FTP) server, and the step <guimenuitem>Select the software to install</guimenuitem>
1861+you will find in addition to the default entry another entry for the rescue mode:
1862+
1863+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1864+Load from Removable Media or Server - Select Software to Install - P00ABCDE:LINLPAR
1865+Select the software to install.
1866+Select | Name | Description
1867+ * | &debian-lc;-server-&release;/boot/rescue.ins | &debian; for z Series (default kernel)
1868+ o | &debian-lc;-server-&release;/boot/&debian-lc;.ins | &debian; for z Series (default kernel)
1869+</screen></informalexample>
1870+
1871+Make sure <guimenuitem>&debian-lc;-server-&release;/boot/rescue.ins</guimenuitem> is selected and proceed with <guimenuitem>OK</guimenuitem>.
1872+</para><para>
1873+For a z/VM guest you need to access the Minidisk where the installer files,
1874+including the <filename>parmfile.&debian-lc;</filename> is located, add the <quote>rescue/enable=true</quote> boot parameter
1875+and proceed like you would usually do for a z/VM installation, means by executing the <guimenuitem>&debian-lc; exec</guimenuitem> REXX script.
1876+
1877+But here it's again better to add a dedicated boot script for the rescue mode.
1878+Therefore you need to copy the <filename>parmfile &debian-lc;</filename> and the <filename>&debian-lc; exec</filename>
1879+to create seperate versions for the rescue mode:
1880+
1881+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1882+Logon to your z/VM system, have CMS active (ipl-ed)
1883+and make sure you have r/w acces to the Minidisk where the installations files are located.
1884+In this example <quote>File Mode</quote> (Fm) <quote>A</quote> is used, that might be different on your system.
1885+Copy the following files:
1886+
1887+copyfiles &debian-lc; exec a rescue exec a
1888+copyfiles parmfile &debian-lc; a parmfile rescue a
1889+
1890+listfiles rescue * a
1891+RESCUE EXEC A1
1892+listfiles * rescue a
1893+PARMFILE RESCUE A1
1894+
1895+Change PARMFILE RESCUE (by default it's empty):
1896+
1897+x PARMFILE RESCUE A
1898+* * * Top of File * * *
1899+
1900+* * * End of File * * *
1901+
1902+To the following:
1903+
1904+x PARMFILE RESCUE A
1905+* * * Top of File * * *
1906+rescue/enable=true
1907+* * * End of File * * *
1908+
1909+Now modify the RESCUE EXEC file as well so that it point to the new <filename>parmfile rescue</filename> file:
1910+x RESCUE EXEC A
1911+* * * Top of File * * *
1912+/* REXX EXEC TO IPL &debian;'s Rescue Mode */
1913+/* z Systems FROM THE VM READER. */
1914+/* */
1915+'CP CLOSE RDR'
1916+'PURGE RDR ALL'
1917+'SPOOL PUNCH * RDR'
1918+'PUNCH KERNEL UBUNTU * (NOHEADER'
1919+'PUNCH PARMFILE RESCUE * (NOHEADER'
1920+'PUNCH INITRD UBUNTU * (NOHEADER'
1921+'CHANGE RDR ALL KEEP NOHOLD'
1922+'CP IPL 000C CLEAR'
1923+* * * End of File * * *
1924+</screen></informalexample>
1925+</para>
1926+
1927+<para>Now start the z/VM guest installation as usual, but using the newly created REXX script for the rescue mode, hence just type:
1928+<command>rescue &lt;Enter&gt;</command>
1929+</para><para>
1930+Don't worry, your system is not about to be overwritten! <quote>Rescue</quote> mode simply takes advantage of the hardware detection facilities available in the installer to ensure that your disks, network devices, and so on are available to you while repairing your system.
1931+</para>
1932+
1933+<para>Using either of the two installation types you'll be shown the first few screens of the installer, with a note in the corner of the display to indicate that this is rescue mode, not a full installation:
1934+
1935+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1936+Rescue mode
1937+ ┌─────────┤ [?] Ubuntu installer main menu ├─────────┐
1938+ │ │
1939+ │ Choose the next step in the install process: │
1940+ │ │
1941+ │ Configure the network device │
1942+ │ Configure the network │
1943+ │ Choose language │
1944+ │ Choose a mirror of the Ubuntu archive │
1945+ │ Download installer components │
1946+ │ Change debconf priority │
1947+ │ Save debug logs │
1948+ │ Execute a shell │
1949+ │ Abort the installation │
1950+ │ │
1951+ └────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
1952+</screen></informalexample>
1953+
1954+Don't worry, your system is not about to be overwritten! Rescue mode simply takes advantage of the hardware detection facilities available in the installer to ensure that your disks, network devices, and so on are available to you while repairing your system.</para>
1955+
1956+<para>
1957 Instead of the partitioning tool, you should now be presented with a list of
1958 the partitions on your system, and asked to select one of them. Normally,
1959 you should select the partition containing the root file system that you
1960 need to repair. You may select partitions on RAID and LVM devices as well as
1961-those created directly on disks.
1962-
1963-</para><para arch="not-s390">
1964+those created directly on disks:
1965+
1966+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1967+Rescue mode
1968+ ┌───────────────────────┤ [!!] Enter rescue mode ├────────────────────────┐
1969+ │ │
1970+ │ Enter a device you wish to use as your root file system. You will be │
1971+ │ able to choose among various rescue operations to perform on this │
1972+ │ file system. │
1973+ │ │
1974+ │ If you choose not to use a root file system, you will be given a │
1975+ │ reduced choice of operations that can be performed without one. This │
1976+ │ may be useful if you need to correct a partitioning problem. │
1977+ │ │
1978+ │ Device to use as root file system: │
1979+ │ │
1980+ │ /dev/sda1 │
1981+ │ /dev/sdb1 │
1982+ │ Assemble RAID array │
1983+ │ │
1984+ │ &lt;Go Back&gt; │
1985+ │ │
1986+ └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
1987+</screen></informalexample>
1988+
1989+<!---
1990+The <guimenuitem>Ubuntu installer main menu</guimenuitem> provides the menu item <guimenuitem>Enter rescue mode</guimenuitem>.
1991+
1992+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
1993+Rescue mode
1994+ ┌──────────────┤ [?] Ubuntu installer main menu ├──────────────┐
1995+ │ │
1996+ │ Choose the next step in the install process: │
1997+ │ │
1998+ │ Detect virtual driver disks from hardware manufacturer │
1999+ │ Configure the network device │
2000+ │ Configure the network │
2001+ │ Choose language │
2002+ │ Choose a mirror of the Ubuntu archive │
2003+ │ Download installer components │
2004+ │ Configure the clock │
2005+ │ Configure direct access storage devices (DASD) │
2006+ │ Activate FCP devices for installation │
2007+ │ Detect disks │
2008+ │ Enter rescue mode * │
2009+ │ │
2010+ └──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
2011+</screen></informalexample>
2012+-->
2013+
2014+</para><para> <!-- removed: arch="not-s390" -->
2015
2016 If possible, the installer will now present you with a shell prompt in the
2017-file system you selected, which you can use to perform any necessary
2018-repairs.
2019+file system you selected, which you can use to perform any necessary repairs.
2020
2021 <phrase arch="any-x86">
2022 For example, if you need to reinstall the GRUB boot loader into the master
2023@@ -90,16 +340,45 @@
2024 <userinput>grub-install '(hd0)'</userinput> to do so.
2025 </phrase>
2026
2027-</para><para arch="not-s390">
2028+</para><para> <!-- removed: arch="not-s390" -->
2029
2030 If the installer cannot run a usable shell in the root file system you
2031 selected, perhaps because the file system is corrupt, then it will issue a
2032 warning and offer to give you a shell in the installer environment instead.
2033+
2034 You may not have as many tools available in this environment, but they will
2035-often be enough to repair your system anyway. The root file system you
2036+often be enough to repair your system anyway.
2037+The root file system you
2038 selected will be mounted on the <filename>/target</filename> directory.
2039
2040-</para><para arch="not-s390">
2041+</para></listitem>
2042+<listitem><para> <!-- FIXME: Does this still apply for amd64, since there is subuquity on amd64? -->
2043+
2044+A trivial option is to just boot the standard installation kernel and initrd without any additional kernel parameter, and select from the inital screen the <guimenuitem>Start shell</guimenuitem> entry.
2045+
2046+<informalexample role="example"><screen>
2047+ ┌────────────────────────┤ [!!] Configuring d-i ├─────────────────────────┐
2048+ │ │
2049+ │ This is the network console for the Debian installer. From here, you │
2050+ │ may start the Debian installer, or execute an interactive shell. │
2051+ │ │
2052+ │ To return to this menu, you will need to log in again. │
2053+ │ │
2054+ │ Network console option: │
2055+ │ │
2056+ │ Start installer │
2057+ │ Start installer (expert mode) │
2058+ │ Start shell │
2059+ │ │
2060+ └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
2061+</screen></informalexample>
2062+
2063+The functionality in the &d-i; shell is limited, however, it can still act as a rescue system to fix a broken installation.
2064+While not using the rescue mode, be careful to not accidentially repartition or format any disk which may cause data loss.
2065+
2066+</para>
2067+</listitem>
2068+</itemizedlist><para>
2069
2070 In either case, after you exit the shell, the system will reboot.
2071
2072
2073=== modified file 'en/preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml'
2074--- en/preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2075+++ en/preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2076@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
2077 If you already have an operating system on your system
2078
2079 <phrase arch="any-x86">
2080-(Windows 9x, Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista/7, OS/2, MacOS, Solaris, FreeBSD, &hellip;)
2081+(Windows 9x, Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista/7/8/10, OS/2, MacOS, Solaris, FreeBSD, &hellip;)
2082 </phrase>
2083
2084 <phrase arch="s390">
2085@@ -34,12 +34,13 @@
2086 partitions with other Unix systems, but that's not covered here.
2087 At the very least you will need a dedicated partition for the &debian;
2088 root filesystem.
2089-<note><para arch="s390">
2090+
2091+<note arch="s390"><para>
2092 Please notice that it's quite unusual on &architecture; to use different partitions of one disk for different operating systems. However, the operating system boundary is usually an entire disk or mini disk rather than a partition.
2093 </para></note>
2094-
2095-</para><para>
2096-
2097+</para>
2098+
2099+<para>
2100 You can find information about your current partition setup by using
2101 a partitioning tool for your current operating system<phrase
2102 arch="any-x86">, such as the integrated Disk Manager in Windows or fdisk in
2103
2104=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/localechooser.xml'
2105--- en/using-d-i/modules/localechooser.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
2106+++ en/using-d-i/modules/localechooser.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2107@@ -63,13 +63,15 @@
2108 that country selected as the default. Use the <guibutton>Go Back</guibutton>
2109 option to select countries on a different continent.
2110
2111-</para><note><para>
2112+</para>
2113+<note><para>
2114
2115 It is important to select the country where you live or where you are
2116 located as it determines the time zone that will be configured for the
2117 installed system.
2118
2119-</para></note><para>
2120+</para></note>
2121+<para>
2122
2123 If you selected a combination of language and country for which no locale is
2124 defined and there exist multiple locales for the language, then the installer
2125
2126=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/mdcfg.xml'
2127--- en/using-d-i/modules/mdcfg.xml 2015-12-19 21:18:18 +0000
2128+++ en/using-d-i/modules/mdcfg.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2129@@ -211,7 +211,8 @@
2130 <guimenu>Use as:</guimenu> <guimenuitem>physical volume for
2131 RAID</guimenuitem> </menuchoice>.)
2132
2133-</para><note><para>
2134+</para>
2135+<note><para>
2136
2137 Make sure that the system can be booted with the partitioning scheme
2138 you are planning. In general it will be necessary to create a separate
2139@@ -222,7 +223,8 @@
2140 <filename>/</filename> and RAID1 for <filename>/boot</filename> can be
2141 an option.
2142
2143-</para></note><para>
2144+</para></note>
2145+<para>
2146
2147 Next, you should choose <guimenuitem>Configure software
2148 RAID</guimenuitem> from the main <command>partman</command> menu.
2149
2150=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/netcfg.xml'
2151--- en/using-d-i/modules/netcfg.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2152+++ en/using-d-i/modules/netcfg.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2153@@ -56,7 +56,8 @@
2154 Fill in the answers from
2155 <xref linkend="needed-info"/>.
2156
2157-</para><note><para>
2158+</para>
2159+<note><para>
2160
2161 Some technical details you might, or might not, find handy: the program
2162 assumes the network IP address is the bitwise-AND of your system's IP
2163@@ -64,7 +65,9 @@
2164 the bitwise OR of your system's IP address with the bitwise negation of
2165 the netmask. It will also guess your gateway. If you can't find any of
2166 these answers, use the offered defaults &mdash; if necessary, you can
2167-change them by editing <filename>/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml</filename> (or <filename>/etc/network/interfaces</filename> - in case you switched from netplan to ifupdown) once the system has been installed.
2168+change them by editing <filename>/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml</filename>
2169+(or <filename>/etc/network/interfaces</filename> - in case you switched from netplan to ifupdown)
2170+once the system has been installed.
2171
2172 </para></note>
2173 </sect4>
2174
2175=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/network-console.xml'
2176--- en/using-d-i/modules/network-console.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2177+++ en/using-d-i/modules/network-console.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2178@@ -69,7 +69,8 @@
2179 login the fingerprint of the remote system will be displayed and
2180 you will have to confirm that it is correct.
2181
2182-</para><note><para>
2183+</para>
2184+<note><para>
2185
2186 The <command>ssh</command> server in the installer uses a default
2187 configuration that does not send keep-alive packets. In principle,
2188@@ -108,7 +109,8 @@
2189 <command>ssh-keygen -R &lt;<replaceable>hostname</replaceable>|<replaceable>IP&nbsp;address</replaceable>&gt;</command>.
2190 </para></footnote> and try again.
2191
2192-</para></note><para>
2193+</para></note>
2194+<para>
2195
2196 After the login you will be presented with an initial screen where you
2197 have two possibilities called <guimenuitem>Start menu</guimenuitem> and
2198
2199=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/partman-crypto.xml'
2200--- en/using-d-i/modules/partman-crypto.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2201+++ en/using-d-i/modules/partman-crypto.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2202@@ -30,14 +30,20 @@
2203 unencrypted, because currently there is no way to load the kernel from
2204 an encrypted partition.
2205
2206-</para><note><para>
2207+</para>
2208+<note><para>
2209
2210 Please note that the performance of encrypted partitions will be
2211 less than that of unencrypted ones because the data needs to be
2212 decrypted or encrypted for every read or write. The performance impact
2213-depends on your CPU speed, chosen cipher, the key length and whether you use hardware assisted cryptography operations or not<phrase arch="s390"> (like supported by CPACF, the Central Processor Assist for Cryptographic Function feature, or the CryptoExpress adapter cards)</phrase>.
2214+depends on your CPU speed, chosen cipher, the key length and whether
2215+you use hardware assisted cryptography operations or not<phrase arch="s390">
2216+(like supported by CPACF,
2217+the Central Processor Assist for Cryptographic Function feature,
2218+or the CryptoExpress adapter cards)</phrase>.
2219
2220-</para></note><para>
2221+</para></note>
2222+<para>
2223
2224 To use encryption, you have to create a new partition by selecting
2225 some free space in the main partitioning menu. Another option is to
2226
2227=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/partman.xml'
2228--- en/using-d-i/modules/partman.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2229+++ en/using-d-i/modules/partman.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2230@@ -332,12 +332,14 @@
2231 This example shows two hard drives divided into several partitions;
2232 the first disk has some free space. Each partition line consists of
2233 the partition number, its type, size, optional flags, file system, and
2234-mountpoint (if any).<note>This particular setup cannot be created
2235+mountpoint (if any).</para>
2236+<note><para>
2237+This particular setup cannot be created
2238 using guided partitioning but it does show possible variation that can
2239-be achieved using manual partitioning.</note>
2240-
2241-</para><para>
2242-
2243+be achieved using manual partitioning.
2244+</para></note>
2245+
2246+<para>
2247 This concludes the guided partitioning. If you are satisfied with the
2248 generated partition table, you can choose <guimenuitem>Finish
2249 partitioning and write changes to disk</guimenuitem> from the menu to
2250
2251=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/pkgsel.xml'
2252--- en/using-d-i/modules/pkgsel.xml 2018-06-06 21:26:51 +0000
2253+++ en/using-d-i/modules/pkgsel.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2254@@ -46,7 +46,9 @@
2255 computer you are installing. If you disagree with these selections you can
2256 deselect them. You can even opt to install no tasks at all at this point.
2257
2258-</para><para arch="s390">
2259+</para>
2260+
2261+<para arch="s390">
2262
2263 In case the installer has a hard requirements on certain packages, like on
2264 &architecture; where openssh is needed for the second installation stage,
2265@@ -54,6 +56,7 @@
2266 <guimenuitem>OpenSSH server</guimenuitem> task is selected to not.
2267
2268 </para>
2269+
2270 <tip><para>
2271
2272 In the standard user interface of the installer, you can use the space bar
2273@@ -76,7 +79,7 @@
2274 </para><para>
2275
2276 Note that this will only work if the packages needed for the desired desktop
2277-environment are actually available. If you are installing using a single
2278+environment are actually available. If you are installing using a single
2279 full CD image, they will possibly need to be downloaded from a network mirror as
2280 some of the needed packages for your choice might only be included on later
2281 CDs. Installing any of the available desktop environments this way should
2282
2283=== modified file 'en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml'
2284--- en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml 2005-10-07 19:51:38 +0000
2285+++ en/using-d-i/modules/s390/dasd.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2286@@ -1,2 +1,9 @@
2287 <!-- retain these comments for translator revision tracking -->
2288 <!-- $Id: dasd.xml 11648 2004-03-22 00:37:46Z joeyh $ -->
2289+
2290+<para>
2291+
2292+DASDs (Direct Attached Storage Devices) are Enhanced Count Key Data (ECKD) encoded, FICON-attached devices and belong to the CCW (channel command word) IO-layer that is unique to &architecture;. They are available in different types, like the common types 3390-3 (or Model 3), 3390-9 (or Model 9), 3390-27 (or Model 27), 3390-54 (or Model 54), or others.
2293+The DASD block size is 4096 bytes (4KB) and they support up to 3 partitions per volume.
2294+
2295+</para>
2296
2297=== added file 'en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml'
2298--- en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000
2299+++ en/using-d-i/modules/s390/fcp.xml 2018-06-21 13:42:34 +0000
2300@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
2301+
2302+<para>
2303+
2304+FCP (Fiber Channel Protocol, also known as zfcp) devices are SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) disk storage devices that are attached using the Fiber Channel Protocol (FCP), use a 512-byte Fixed Block Architecture (FBA) encoding and also belong to the CCW IO-layer. These SCSI (over-FCP) devices can be defined in any size (up to 2TB) at the storage subsystem and support up to 15 partitions per volume.
2305+
2306+<note><para>
2307+
2308+z/VM supports FCP devices as <quote>emulated devices</quote>, or in short <quote>EDEV</quote>.
2309+In this case SCSI disks are configured as disk units of type DASD 9336 FBA.
2310+For more details see the IBM z/VM documentation.
2311+</para></note>
2312+
2313+</para>

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